Posts Tagged ‘10’

(by Gemma Correll)

 

My sixth Wine Bloggers Conference was approached with trepidation. I’ve been questioning the utility of the semantics of “blogger” and “wine blogger” of late. Also, I knew nothing of Penticton, British Columbia. Finally, very few of my closer blogging-friends and colleagues would be in attendance.

The format was the same. Bring together “wine bloggers” in a wine region to discover that region, learn about wines from other parts of the world, explore their wine writing avocation amongst their peers and strengthen the camaraderie of the group. It turns out my trepidation was without merit. It was a very successful conference for me despite nearly coughing up my lungs with a nasty bout of the flu. I learned a lot this weekend.

1. Modern Greek Vin Santo is an amazing wine and should be discovered by all wine lovers.

2. Lungs can’t actually be “coughed up”, but you can exercise and tighten up your stomach muscles in the process of discovering it’s not possible.

3. Penticton, British Columbia really is a “must visit” for serious wine lovers, and its “Penticton Lakeside Resort” was the most beautiful venue yet for a Wine Bloggers Conference.

4. It would do all wine bloggers good to focus equally as much on the quality of their writing as on the extent of their wine knowledge.

 

Read on …

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On the rise …

 

It used to be the drink reserved for a hot summer’s day but now consumers are increasingly turning to Rose wine throughout the year with sales up 10 per cent in the last 13 years.

Rose now accounts for a record one in eight bottles of wine bought in supermarkets and off-licences, up from one in 40 in the year 2000.

Sales of rose wine in shops are currently worth £646 million in Britain, nearly £1.8 million a day, according to figures from market analysts Nielsen.

While growth in rose wine buying has slowed in recent years – attributed to poor summer weather – experts believe it is becoming a drink that is enjoyed all year round.

It is especially popular among women drinkers on a night out or sharing a bottle at home with friends.

Some winemakers have specifically targeted women drinkers by making less strong varieties with a typical alcohol by volume level of nine or 10 per cent, compared with other wines which can be up to 14 per cent in some cases.
Read on …

Durbanville Hills cellar 01

 

 

From its first vintage 15 years ago, Durbanville Hills Wines, which is located on the Tygerberg Hills and overlooks Table Mountain and Table Bay, has produced some of the best received super premium wines in the country.

Cellar master Martin Moore, who was appointed in 1998 when the cellar was still in the early stages of construction, reminisces fondly of the first vintage and the memorable wines produced in 1999.

“When the first grapes were delivered to the presses, work had not even started on that part of the building which today houses the maturation cellar, restaurant and wine-tasting area.

“But regardless of the challenges both the Luipaardsberg Merlot and the Biesjes Craal Sauvignon blanc from our first vintage received double gold at Veritas while the Durbanville Hills Chardonnay was awarded gold. During that first vintage just over 3 000 tons of grapes were pressed. Within a few short years production moved up to reach the cellar’s full capacity of 8 000 tons,” says Moore.

“Over the years we have extended our product range to showcase the diverse terroir of the area. During the 15 years we have created a number of what I believe are quite remarkable wines; wines which in my view truly capture the unique flavour spectrum found on our valley slopes.”

Durbanville Hills has over the years become particularly known for its top-quality Sauvignon blanc, due also to the cool-climate location of its production units which all enjoy ideal conditions for growing this cultivar.

“During the summer months and then mostly in the late afternoon, the southeaster , blows off False Bay over the Cape Flats, bringing with it cool, moist air. The wind is surprisingly cold as it comes sweeping over the contours of the hills, cooling down the vineyards even on the hottest day. And when the southeaster is not blowing, a westerly wind coming off the cold Atlantic produces the same results,” says Moore.

Sauvignon blanc is represented across the cellar’s three wine ranges. All of them regularly receive awards at national and international competitions. Although the wines can be enjoyed immediately, the winery’s Sauvignon blancs are known for their longevity, with the Biesjes Craal in particular lasting for up to ten years.

The wines are available from the cellar and leading liquor outlets and retail for about R52 in the case of the 2012 Durbanville Hills Sauvignon Blanc and R85 for the 2012 Rhinofields Sauvignon Blanc while you should expect to pay about R115 for the 2012 Biesjes Craal Sauvignon Blanc.

 

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Drinking beer and watching sport go together like hot dogs and mustard, so we’ve chosen the top brews to cheer your team.

Beer is the go-to drink for a summer watching sport. Whether it’s the start of the new football season, a glance at motor racing, or the wall-to-wall sportsfest that was the Olympics, there’s a beer for everything.

We trace the best brews and weave our way from Canadian ice hockey to NASCAR racing, South African vuvuzelas to Brazilian samba, and even a spot of beer advice from Shane Warne.
Read on …

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The true origins of viticulture and brewing, whether it was in Sumeria, the Lebanon, Georgia and so on, may never be known for sure.

What is sure is that ever since he first created alcoholic drinks, man has usually ascribed to them divine properties.

As was pointed out in the Top 10 Wine Saints, Christianity merely replaced the old gods of wine, beer, grapes and grain, with new figureheads.

This often makes the identification of “wine gods” rather tricky and, aside from some of the more obvious standouts, ancient cultures and societies often venerated many figures connected to drink.

The Greeks in particular personified many things relating to wine, its effects and preparation, with minor deities.

There was Methe, the personification of drunkenness, Acratopotes, one of Dionysus’ companions and a drinker of unmixed wine, there was Ceraon who watched over the mixing of wine with water and Amphictyonis a goddess of wine and friendship between nations.

 

Read on …

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Happy New Year! Now the festivities are over and the crystal glasses are back in the cupboard, it’s time to take out the crystal ball. Here are 10 of the most significant wine trends to watch for in 2013:

 

1. Bull market for consumption:

It may not be a bull market for much in the United States these days, but it’s a bull market for wine consumption. The year just finished may well mark the 19th consecutive 12-month period of growth in per capita consumption, resulting in the U.S. becoming the largest wine market in the world (though it remains a mere middleweight in per capita terms). Wine is hot; wine is the new black.

While Baby Boomers may reach for familiar selections, the youngest wine consumers – the Millennials – show a strong interest in wines and a curiosity to try them from many different regions or grapes.

2. The winter of wine critics:

These same Millennials are different from their elders in how they get wine recommendations – they rely on friends (both online and offline) and store clerks more than they value the opinions of the critics who have guided consumers over the past three decades. America today boasts one of the most knowledgeable wine-buying populations in the world, leading to the profusion of blogs and tweets and status updates about wine. While point-spewing critics may have helped create this knowledge base, increasingly savvy consumers are looking elsewhere for recommendations.

3. The threat of craft beer:

The rise of craft beer in America is a tremendously exciting story. While the makers of macro brews keep buying one another and consolidating in a time of flat suds, the micro brewers are experiencing 16-percent growth. Younger buyers are attracted to the beers that actually have flavor profiles, rather than ones that simply slake a summer thirst or wash down wings.

With cicerones (beer sommeliers) popping up at restaurants, and with beer’s perceived relative value-for-money status, it’s no surprise that the San Francisco-based news website SF Weekly recently wrote: “Craft beer is overtaking wine as San Francisco’s beverage of choice.” Craft beer and a less-than-robust economy pose the biggest threat to the bull market in American wine consumption.

Read on …

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The final instalment of our top 50 most powerful women in wine reveals those ranked from 10 to 1.
This is it. Having ranked numbers 50-11, we bring you our top 10 most powerful women in wine at the forefront of both wine trends and consumer opinion forming.

Designed to draw the trade’s attention to the increasingly important role played by women in the wine industry, the final ten on our list, based in the UK, US, France and China, are at the top of their game.
Read on to see who took the top spot?…

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WARNING: BAD CONTENT INSIDE!
Excessive exposure to bad content has been linked to irreversible brain damage. Women should not read bad content during pregnancy because of the risk of birth defects. Consumption of bad content may impair your ability to drive or operate machinery, and may cause sudden death syndrome.
Wine Folly is nearing our 1 year anniversary.
This means a couple of things: That we are drinking a lot of wine. It also means that we’re taking a good hard look at what worked and what didn’t over the last year.

While slightly intoxicated we had an idea. (Likely a bad idea.) Why not celebrate our worst posts of 2012? Without further ado, we present to you…

Yep. We suck.
Top 10 Worst Posts of 2012

#10 The Champagne Spoon Trick Works.. If You Believe in Magic
It’s a fun little myth that a silver spoon can keep your Champagne nice and bubbly. We actually like this post, but the metrics tell us it’s a stinker. Oh well!

Read on …

Two South African sparkling wines, Pongracz Rosé Brut and Boschendal Le Grand Pavillon Brut Rosé, made it onto the top 10 “Best Sparkling Wines in the World” list at the 2012 Effervescents du Monde competition held in Dijon, France earlier this month.

 

Effervescents du Monde is a competition where over 100 judges select the best sparkling wines from 660 entries coming from 25 countries around the world.

The Top 10 2012 actually includes 19 wines as “some wines are rigorously equal” and could not be excluded from the list, Effervescents du Monde said in a statement. The winners were announced at the event hosted from 14 to 16 November.

The competition’s ambition is to “award reliable and representative medals each year, reflecting the founding motto of Effervescents du Monde: diversity, quality and high standards”.

Read on …