Posts Tagged ‘100’

(Image by Hanson Chiropractic Center)

(Image by Hanson Chiropractic Center)

 

When it comes to the secrets of living to 100, the life-giving properties of alcoholic drinks have featured in the top tips from many centenarians.
There have been many health benefits associated with alcohol, when consumed in moderation, including battling lung cancer, lowering cholesterol and helping with arthritis.

Recent celebrants include Helen Kimsey from Lincolnshire, who celebrated her 100th birthday in February saying that a glass of white wine was her secret. While in March Jim Baines from Norfolk reached his 100th birthday saying that a regular drink of Guinness was the key.

Simone from Paris celebrated her 104th birthday with a glass (or two) of Drappier Champagne. Simone’s daughter, who is herself in her 80s, said that the drink “keeps you young”. Yesterday we revealed that new research has suggested that three glasses of Champagne every week can help boost memory and stave off Alzheimer’s and dementia.

So we have looked back at the tips from a number of centenarians, who have answered that common question on a 100th birthday: “What is the secret to a long life?”

If you want to get your telegram from the Queen, then these are the top tips from those who have been there and done that.

 
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Scores 100 points!!!

Scores 100 points!!!

 

A price war is raging among retailers in Australia over the 2008 vintage of Penfolds Grange, which received a perfect 100-point score from The Wine Advocate.

In a bid to lure buyers with the lowest retail price, Australian liquor chain Dan Murphy’s cut its price from AU$669 to AU$645 (£423) in order to go lower than US supermarket chain Costco as the cheapest place to buy the prized new release.

According to The Sydney Morning Herald, Costco responded to Dan Murphy’s discounting yesterday by knocking a further $5 off its price to bring it down to $645.

Sydney-based independent wine merchant Kemenys is also selling the wine for $645, despite it carrying a recommended retail price of AU$785 (£515).

Meanwhile, UK-based fine wine merchant Farr Vintners has waded into the pricing war, matching Dan Murphy’s and Costco’s price, selling the wine at £350 in bond, which, with VAT and duty added, works out at £422.40 a bottle.

Having put 78 bottles on sale yesterday, the wine was already moving quickly at Costco’s Melbourne store, with assistant manager Nick Weller reporting “fantastic” sales.
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In the last decade, I have discovered that the wines I enjoy the most are often produced by organic and biodynamic wineries. This intrigues me.

I come from an era when a slogan beloved in my high school, was “Better living through chemicals.” By nature, I tend to worry less about motivation and more about outcome. In addition, I spent the last 30 years of my life with a morbid fascination of fraud, particularly wine fraud.

These three factors make me somewhat skeptical about the quasi-religious faith systems many consumers invest in their foods and eating habits. I cannot think of anybody less inclined to chase organic products than myself.

What most consumers don’t realize is how entrenched are the notions of organic viticulture. Some of the largest producers in the world are organic and more are choosing this route every year. Many of them always have been organic. As it happens, the back label of a wine bottle is a lousy place to try to explain this to consumers. Therefore, I am writing a series of columns on the various forms of viticulture and production this takes.
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Earlier this week I wrote about a French wine film, “Tu seras mon fils,” that I would give it 3 stars on a 5-star scale. How many points on the 100-point wine scale is that?

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It’s not an easy question, nor is it irrelevant this time of year. We’re all choosing movies to see, buying Christmas presents we haven’t heard, and buying wines we haven’t tasted.

I’m a big fan of using Metacritic in building my wish list for Santa. Metacritic compiles text reviews from magazines and uses an algorithm to convert them to the 100-point scale. Because I’d rather listen to an 80-point Jack White album than a 90-pointer from Taylor Swift, I read the reviews, which of course you should do with wine, and the algorithm is reasonably good.

Metacritic rates albums from about 60 to 100. Movie critics rate movies from zero to 5 stars. But as we all know, the 100-point scale for wine is really only about 82 to 100.

Is there some factual basis for this?
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