Posts Tagged ‘4’

Around four million adults in the UK currently brew their own beer or wine at home, according to the financial advice website, http://www.allaboutmoney.com/.
The research found that around 8% of us either regularly or occasionally make our own beer or wine, and another 24% have done so in the past. According to All About Money the practice of home brewing can cost drinkers less than a tenth of the price of a pint down the pub.

Ian Williams of All About Money commented: “When you’re looking for ways to save money, a nice pint after work is probably the last thing you want to give up. But our research shows you can have that pint and save money, and you might just have fun doing it too.

“There’s no substitute for a good pint in your favourite pub or restaurant, but there’s a lot to be said for enjoying something you’ve put your own time and effort into making.”

Read on …

The 7 Main Wine Faults
Oxidized Wine …aka maderized wine

What it is: Contamination/chemical breakdown caused by too much oxygen exposure. Rusted metal is oxidized…it’s that same process but in your wine. Oxidization is the most common wine fault and is easy to replicate at home with any bottle of wine.
How you can tell: Oxidized wines lose their brightness, both in color and in flavor. Bright reds turn to brick color or brownish, and fresh tastes develop drier, more bitter characteristics. White wines are much more susceptible to oxidization than reds, because reds’ higher tannin levels act as a buffer. If you really want to see what this looks like: open a new bottle, pour a glass and save that bottle for about a week. Congrats, your bottle is ruined. Drink some and compare it to that first glass you had.
Can I fix it? No, but you can prolong the shelf life of opened wine by using a wine preserving tool. If your bottle is oxidized right off the shelf, it was either poorly sealed or mishandled. Take it back!

2,4,6-Trichloroanisole (TCA) …aka cork taint

What it is: A chemical containment that found its way into your bottle somewhere in production, usually from the wooden cork. TCA can be present in oak barrels, or the processing lines at the winery as well, which leads to entire batches, rather than single bottles, being ruined.
How you can tell: Dank odor and taste like wet newspaper, moldy basement or smelly dog. It’s estimated that over 2% of bottles are tainted with TCA to some degree, making it the second most common wine fault.
Can I fix it? Andrew Waterhouse, professor of wine chemistry at the UC Davis, claims you can pour the wine into a bowl with a sheet of plastic wrap. The TCA will be attracted to the polyethylene and pulled from your wine. I say life is too short for fixing wine faults. Send that bottle back!

Sulfur Compounds

What it is: Sulfur is a common additive to wine typically used to prevent other wine faults found in this article (ironically). Sometimes things can go wrong in its deployment though, and sulfur levels that are out of whack are pretty easy to notice.
How you can tell: There are 4 primary sulfur compounds that can give your wine some funk, but they all manifest themselves in terrible flavors and smells. If you notice rotten egg, fart, burnt rubber, skunk, or asparagus pee in your wine, you probably have a sulfur problem.
Can I fix it? The offending flavor can be weakened through decanting (watch this). If it is strong though, you should send it back from whence it came.

Read on …

CLICK to download PDF of Common Wine Faults