Posts Tagged ‘advertising’

 
The health lobby in France has invoked the Evin Law in a call for stricter limits on what bloggers and social media users can write about wine online.

 
A report on the issues of addiction in France entitled ‘Les Dommages Liés Aux Addictions et les Strategies Validées pour Reduire Ces Dommages’ (Damage related to addictions and strategies for reducing the damage) is being prepared as part of the background to forming government policy from 2013-2017.

One of the suggestions put forward is that alcohol promotion should be formally forbidden on the internet and social media, including promotion of wine.

Specific sites belonging to producers, online wine merchants or wine tourism sites would be exempt, but wine bloggers would fall under the definition of sites that would be no longer authorised, as would any specific advertising or promotion of wine.
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The drinks business has compiled a list of the current top 10 Champagne brands by global volume sales.

While there are few dramatic changes to this year’s rankings – the slide by Piper Heidsieck was widely forecasted as a result of the brand’s recent repositioning – what does stand out is the decline in sales seen by so many of these major players in the Champagne category.

For many consumers, especially in more traditional markets, Champagne stands firm as the ultimate celebratory drink. However, this slide in sales appears to be the result of two aligning forces: ongoing economic difficulties in some of the category’s biggest markets and the growing competition Champagne faces from an increasingly ambitious sparkling wine market.

Read on to find out which brands are dominating today’s Champagne market.

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Neft Vodka ad...

 

New research suggests that market leaders in the alcohol industry are being left behind in social video marketing because “they are not optimising their content for social web”.
Video technology company Unruly, has published a report called “Untapped Potential: The State of Sharing in the Alcohol Sector”, which found that despite enjoying significant growth in the last quarter, a staggering 97% of the alcohol sector’s video shares came from just four adverts. The four ads, which came from Budweiser, Carlsberg, Heineken and little-known Russian-Austrian vodka brand, Neft, represent less than 1% of the alcohol adverts released in 2013.

The report also suggests that market leaders such as Diageo and SAB Miller are lagging behind in social video sharing, while wine brands have remained the slowest to embrace social video, attracting less than 1% of the sharing activity during the final quarter of 2012 and the first of 2013. This trend was also noticeable earlier this year, when db revealed the Top 10 brands ruling social media.

Ian Forrester, Unruly’s insight director, said: “The research found that some of the big alcohol brands – and subsectors – are vastly underperforming in social video.

“For wine and spirit brands, the opportunity to increase brand awareness and sales conversion rates through social video is huge, as there has been very little mass movement from these brands in creating shareable video content.

“Additionally, leading brands like Diageo and SAB Miller that have very strong market share are lagging behind competitors when it comes to social video share of voice.”

The report also highlighted the impact of spirits brands on beer brands, which historically dominate alcohol advertising. Beer brands’ share of voice dropped from 97% in the fourth quarter of 2012 to 75% in the first quarter of 2013.

The report also published details of the most shared alcohol videos of all time, and you can click through the following pages to find out which these videos were.
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Selling commodities is difficult because people buy on emotion, or instinct if you will. Want and desire are powerful emotions that can stimulate the release of endorphins. It’s why some people are shop-a-holics. It feels good to buy. But it’s not that easy to get emotionally worked up about borax, chlorine, and salt. As an economic good, a commodity has no real differentiation, so small price differences in competing products can make huge differences in total sales.

Think about how you won’t buy gasoline at one gas station because it’s four cents cheaper around the corner. That’s a commodity. Ever buy a piece of art that way? Of course not because art’s value is in the eye of the beholder, is easily differentiated, and consequently will have wide price ranges. When art is sold, it’s sold on the artist’s reputation or the emotion the piece evokes for someone. Marketers work overtime to take commodity-like goods and then pretend they aren’t commodities by creating and building an emotional appeal around the brand.

 Take the above deodorant commercial. Did you hear mention of the product characteristics as a differentiator? Nowhere does this commercial say Old Spice is made with orange, lemon, clary sage, heliotrope, pimento berry and musk, even though those were the original Old Spice ingredients. The creative team instead focused on delivering an emotional image; something with a human connection that ties back to the product.
 
In this case in a humorous way, they are talking about sex-appeal and are really targeting women who are by far the larger purchasers of family groceries still. The subliminal note is if you get Old Spice for your husband, he will look like this …….. or maybe the message is he will ride a horse? I don’t know but I am wearing Old Spice and on a horse right now. Look at me….

 

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The key to winery social media success is to stay consistent and keep up-to-date with your fans by posting comments about your winery.

 

It’s easy to open a page and be committed to it for a while, but then feeling it’s too time consuming, or getting stumped with writers block, you begin to slowly drift away and hope that the page is running itself. We previously posted a blog about a program we offer, where you can effectively spend 20 minutes a week on Facebook promoting your winery to your customers and now we have a plan to help you utilize those 20 minutes by engaging those clients with 5 Great Topics to Post to Your Facebook Page.

Post about Your Winery Production

Club and potential club members will go to your Facebook page as outsiders looking in. They’re fans of your winery and they want to know what’s happening on the inside, they’ll be curious about what you’re up to. Give them visual access to the inside of your winery by posting pictures about:

•Changes or improvements of your vineyard
•Harvest Season
•Winemaking process
•Bottling
Promote an Event
I can’t remember the last time I got an actual paper invitation in the mail. All of my invitations come electronically anymore. If you want to build wine club memberships, generate a guest list or interest to an upcoming event, or discuss a post event, upload it to Facebook. Share photos and posts of:

•A venue you’re going to that may be outside of your winery
•Internal events that are coming up
•Post internal events
•Release of a new vintage
•A special wine tasting
•A successful cooking class
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Don't forget the consumers with a sweet tooth!

Don’t forget the consumers with a sweet tooth!

 

The wine industry is failing to keep up with changing tastes among consumers, according to drinks analyst Jonny Forsyth of Mintel, speaking at the LIWF today.

 

Forsyth said consumers are becoming increasingly sweet toothed and adventurous in the products they choose.

 

However, he added, unlike other industries the wine trade is failing to keep up, to its commercial detriment.

 

Forsyth said: “Consumers are evolving, I’m not convinced that wine is evolving quite enough to follow this.”

 

He added sugar consumption in the UK had risen by 31% since 1990, with the average Brit now consuming 700g of sugar each week while in the US each American consumes 130lb of sugar per year.

 

Forsyth said the impact can already be seen in the industry, with rosé now having a market share in the UK of 11%, up from just 1% 10 years ago.

 

Read on …

 

Beverage makers selling wine, beer and spirits using the freewheeling world of social media are being gently reined in by the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau.

In new guidelines, the federal government declared that sites like Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn are essentially new forms of advertising. As a result, companies selling adult beverages on those sites are subject to advertising rules, according to regulators.

“Social media just exploded in the last few years, and it seems like every week there’s a new way to get your message out there,” said Sara Mann, attorney with Hinman & Carmichael, a San Francisco law firm specializing in the beverage industry. “I think wineries and other suppliers have been confused and a little unsure about what they can and can’t do.”

 

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Sex, drugs, and wine ...

Sex, drugs, and wine …

Intemperance comes in many flavors, and SLO Down Wines has pairings for all of them.

The California winemaker has rolled out three irreverent ads (from Harvest Films director Baker Smith and Arcade Edit’s Paul Martinez and Dean Miyahira) about how well its Sexual Chocolate wine goes with group sex, horse role playing and bong rips, respectively. There’s some light parody of insufferable wine-chat (“It’s the deep red of a … really red thing”), but they don’t spend too much time dwelling on it, and I’m glad they committed to the weird direction these ads went in. Well, except for the part where I saw Brandon Allen in a thong. I may need a glass of wine to throw in my eyes after that.
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Digital Facts you must know...

Digital Facts you must know…

 

01. Mobile internet usage is projected to overtake desktop internet usage by 2014

The facts and numbers around mobile usage is pretty staggering. Over 1 billion mobile devices are currently in use, and the number keeps on growing. We use and rely on our phones on a daily basis and if you don’t have a mobile friendly website you will get lost in the shuffle. By 2014 mobile internet usage should outpace desktops. This stat varies by source but 2014/15 is right around the corner. 2013 is the year to think about how your website caters to the mobile market.
02. Yes, you really do need a mobile friendly website

Not having a mobile friendly site will hurt the user experience as well as brand reputation. Google did a study on what users want from a mobile site and here are a few key points: 50% of people said that even if they like a business, they will use them less often if the website isn’t mobile friendly. And 48% said that if a site didn’t work well on their smartphones, it made them feel like the company didn’t care about their business.
03. Responsive design is the solution to the mobile dilemma

If you are not mobile friendly the solution resides within a technique called responsive design. Essentially this happens in the coding of the site and allows you to create one website that works across all devices. Knowing that 2014 is around the bend, and if you are planning to redesign your website, I strongly encourage implementing a responsive site. With the one site for all devices mindset this eliminates the need for specific mobile domains. With one site for all devices, content is managed in one spot and you don’t have to worry about a seperate domain for mobile search rankings.
04. Search engine websites are the most visited websites on a smartphone

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Learn how to promote your wine events better.

Learn how to promote your wine events better.

 

While using social media or any kind of mail, e or snail, it can be difficult to stay on the correct side of the line between “how very interesting” and “report spam.” When done right, postcards, email and Facebook can be great ways to get the word out and keep your audience clued in about your winery’s upcoming events.

In the case of all 3, make sure that the names in your database were volunteered and not harvested from another online source by you or a broker. Trust in mailing lists has been declining for a while now thanks to their abuse. However, if your recipients asked to receive updates then your response rates will directly reflect that vote of confidence.

Postcard
In this digital age of lol cats, instant message immediacy, sparkly web banners and pop up ads, there is not a better target for a postcard than that of the cultured wine drinker. The luxury of wine denotes a subscription to a slower, higher quality lifestyle. A good postcard does the same.

Powerful headline
A good postcard makes use of the headline. Grab the viewer’s attention and get them curious with a statement like “5 Courses – 65 Wines.” Have fun with it, but know your audience too. “The Redefine Wine and Dine Event” speaks to a very different audience than “Drink Up Bitches” as a headline.

It Should Look and Feel as Good as the Wine
You have a special opportunity with any print media to deliver actual quality rather than trying to convey it. Like an unfiltered Chardonnay, the substrate can be rich and full-bodied with a real tactile experience. Or, capture an oily texture with a coated stock that will really showcase the colors with refinement and polish. The feel of the winery can really be promoted here as the entire, full bleed side of the postcard is available to be designed.

Information
Of course, don’t forget to give them the information. Provide the date of the event, the time, location and description of why they really shouldn’t be missing out. Give them a link to find more information online but make sure the URL is short and sweet. They can’t click on it so it’s never been more important to avoid that convoluted jumble of nonsensical letters, numbers and special characters. (Really, though, it’s always a good idea.)

Be sure to include:

•date
•time
•description
•where they can find more information
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