Posts Tagged ‘Age’

(Image by Hanson Chiropractic Center)

(Image by Hanson Chiropractic Center)

 

When it comes to the secrets of living to 100, the life-giving properties of alcoholic drinks have featured in the top tips from many centenarians.
There have been many health benefits associated with alcohol, when consumed in moderation, including battling lung cancer, lowering cholesterol and helping with arthritis.

Recent celebrants include Helen Kimsey from Lincolnshire, who celebrated her 100th birthday in February saying that a glass of white wine was her secret. While in March Jim Baines from Norfolk reached his 100th birthday saying that a regular drink of Guinness was the key.

Simone from Paris celebrated her 104th birthday with a glass (or two) of Drappier Champagne. Simone’s daughter, who is herself in her 80s, said that the drink “keeps you young”. Yesterday we revealed that new research has suggested that three glasses of Champagne every week can help boost memory and stave off Alzheimer’s and dementia.

So we have looked back at the tips from a number of centenarians, who have answered that common question on a 100th birthday: “What is the secret to a long life?”

If you want to get your telegram from the Queen, then these are the top tips from those who have been there and done that.

 
Read on …

The near future ....

The near future ….

 

Experts say Sun’s activity wanes every 200 years – and the next ‘cooling period’ is due by 2040

  • Russian scientists believe the Sun emits less heat every 200 years
  • Cooling period could cause Earth’s temperature to fall by several degrees
  • Last time was between 1650 and 1850, known as the ‘Little Ice Age’
  • The period of low solar activity could start between 2030 and 2040

..Forget global warming – the Earth may soon be plunged into a 250-year cooling period, scientists have claimed.
Russian climate experts believe that every 200 years the Sun’s activity temporarily wanes and it emits less heat.
They believe this ‘cooling period’ could cause the earth’s average temperature to fall by several degrees.
 
Scientists believe that every 200 years the Sun emits less heat, resulting in a big freeze
The last time this occurred was between 1650 and 1850 – a period known as the ‘Little Ice Age’.
At the time, most of Britain’s rivers would freeze over during the bitter winters.
Contemporary paintings show people could even cross the Thames using ice skates.

The next ‘cooling period’ is scheduled to start between 2030 and 2040.
But scientists from Pulkovo Observatory in St Petersburg think the cold period is unlikely to be as harsh as the last one.

Researcher Yuri Nagovitsyn said: ‘Evidently, solar activity is on the decrease.
‘In this respect, we could be in for a cooling period that lasts 200 to  250 years.

Read on …

 

 

If so, where’s the action?

 

We’ve all heard it said—many of us have probably said it ourselves—that we’re living in a Golden Age for fine wine. But is it true?

I’d say that, yes, it is true—up to a point. It is a Golden Age for fine wine. But not for every producer, and it’s not everywhere, either. And that, in turn, is why not everyone gets in on the golden deal merely by showing up with a credit card. You’ve got to know where to look.

For example, this is not really a golden era for Napa Valley. Oh sure, it’s golden in the financial sense. Don’t cry for Napa’s Evitas. They’re doing just fine, thank you.

But Napa’s golden moment is now past. It occurred back in the 1980s. That was when you saw and felt and tasted an electrifying excitement. New wineries seemingly emerged every day. New concepts in winemaking were explored, exalted and then sometimes discarded, all in the name of a continuing revolution—and revelation.
Read on …

Wines being aged in a cellar.

Wines being aged in a cellar.

 

Wines have changed and so have our palates

My greatest wine dream—and I’ll bet it’s yours, too—was a wine cellar. Not just the actual cool-temperature space, but one that was filled. I dreamed of a cellar so full that I could easily forget about whole cases of wine for years at a time, the better to let them age to a fantasized perfection.

That dream came true. It took me years—decades, really—to achieve. And it cost me a disproportionate amount of my limited and precious discretionary income, especially when I was only just starting out as a writer. I was motivated, obsessed even, by a vision of what might be called futuristic beauty. How soaringly beautiful it would be in 15 or 20 years!

I wasn’t wrong—then. But I wouldn’t be right for today. What’s changed? Surely me, of course. I’ve had decades of wine drinking to discover that my fantasized wine beauty only rarely became a reality. But I had to find that out for myself. And I’m glad I did.

But it isn’t all personal, either. In recent years it’s become obvious that an ever greater number of wines that once absolutely required extended aging no longer do.

Simply put, most of today’s fine wines—not all, mind you—will reach a point of diminishing returns on aging after as few as five years of additional cellaring after release. Stretch that to a full 10 years of additional aging and I daresay you will have embraced fully 99 percent of all the world’s wines, never mind how renowned or expensive.

I can hear you already. What about this famous red Bordeaux? Or that fabled red Burgundy? What about grand cru Chablis? Or a great Brunello di Montalcino? Or Barolo?
Read on …

Archaeologists working in western Cyprus with their discovery of a Bronze Age ‘microbrewery’

 

Archaeologists working in western Cyprus have uncovered a Bronze Age “microbrewery”.

 

The team excavated a mud-plaster domed structure, which it says was used as a kiln to dry malt and make beer 3,500 years ago.

The discovery also included “juglets”, which the team thinks would have been used to help created beers of different flavours.

The excavation is taking place at the Early-Middle Bronze Age settlement of… read on