Posts Tagged ‘Alternative’

 

 

 

The future of (faster) wine aging is here

One of the enemies of the wine lover is time. The greatest wines in the world are meant to be aged, to be given the time to allow oxygen, and who knows what else, to work their magic on young wine. The edges smooth out, the texture turns silky, flavors gain nuance, depth and complexity. It’s magic in the bottle, though nobody can fully explain what happens in that bottle.

While wine lovers tend to be a pretty geeky crowd, I know that many (if not most) of us aren’t nearly as interested in the how’s as we are in the what’s. Give us your finely aged wines and we’ll be a bunch of happy campers. Of course, knowing which of your bottles are ready to drink, which are past peak, which need more time and which are just trashed is a mystery that can only be solved by pulling the cork and drinking the wine—until now!

We’re thrilled to be the first to announce a new, groundbreaking technique for wine lovers: AmmazzaVino vacuum dehydration storage! AmmazzaVino founder and CEO Gianni Brunellopolis sat down with me recently to discuss the advantages of AmmazzaVino, and how it’s going to revolutionize the wine collecting world.
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We are serving beer at the dinner table tonight!

We are serving beer at the dinner table tonight!

Now with over 2,000 breweries operating across the country that produce a wide variety of beer – more people are choosing a craft beer while enjoying a nice meal –over a bottle of wine or a mixed cocktail.

In the mood for a steak? Instead of a Cabernet Sauvignon for your rib eye, try a brown ale like Moose Drool Brown Ale. Think white wine is the only thing that goes with fish? Try a Belgian Witbier or Belgian White beer instead.

Watch the latest video at video.foxnews.com

“I think just the flavors and all the uniqueness of all the craft beers that are out there just provide a lot of value for the customers,” said Raul Gonzalez, owner and executive chef of Rulis’ International Kitchen in El Paso, Texas. “With the way the economy’s been, people are looking out. They are trying to get bang for their buck,” said Gonzalez.
A craft beer costs someone $4 or 5 for a pint or bottle, whereas a glass of wine can be as much as $15, with even moderately-priced bottles starting at $25. Gonzalez said his customers generally aren’t as intimated by ordering a bottle of beer, as they are when picking wine.
“I think wine for the longest time, people assumed it’s only for the rich, only for the knowledgeable,” said Gonzalez. “Beer is so much easier to access,” he added.
Adrian Perez, a craft brands manager with L&F Distributing in El Paso, said he’s seen many wine drinkers make the transition to beer. “When they hear ‘hops,’ ‘malty’, ‘bitter,’ ‘sweet’ – they’re curious to see how it is so they break that old niche they had,” said Perez.
In Gonzalez’s restaurant the wine list is getting shorter while the beer list has expanded –a trend that those the hospitality business say extends to wine and beer stores in El Paso.
“The craft beer sales are off the chart here in El Paso. Compared to five, maybe seven years ago we had maybe a dozen labels, now we’re in the hundreds,” said Perez.

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Sulfur dioxide is used to stop wine oxidizing and spoiling, but it can cause health problems for some people. A three-year, $5-million EU-funded project has now discovered a potential replacement for SO2.

European researchers are close to finding an effective alternative to adding sulfur dioxide to red wine and other foodstuffs, which could make future holiday seasons happier and healthier for millions.

Sulfur dioxide (SO2), often labeled as E220, is used as a preservative for certain dried fruits and in winemaking as an antimicrobial and antioxidant. Most people can tolerate a small amount of SO2 in their food and wine, but for others it can cause allergic reactions or have other side effects such as headaches.

The European Union-funded so2say project believes it may now have identified a combination of two extracts that can be used instead. Both of them occur naturally in wine and could reduce the presence of SO2 by more than 95 percent, say researchers.

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