Posts Tagged ‘American’

Photo by Anthony Two Moons.

Photo by Anthony Two Moons.

From Santa Barbara to British Columbia, Native American vineyards are a growing business

When the first wine grapes were planted in California by Spanish missionaries in the late 1700s, the Chumash people’s economic empire extended from the Malibu shores through Santa Barbara to the Paso Robles plains. But by the time the modern wine industry emerged on the Central Coast a couple centuries later, the Chumash were struggling, much like many Native American tribes. The few dozen who managed to achieve federal recognition as the Santa Ynez Band of Mission Indians were left with a little slice of land, where most residents lived below the poverty line.

Fast forward to today, and the Chumash are once again propsering, thanks to a successful casino and resort they built on their Santa Ynez Valley reservation in 2004. Six years later, with hopes of expanding their reservation, the 154-member tribe bought a nearby 1,400-acre property for a reported $40 million from the late actor-turned-vintner Fess Parker. The land came with 256 acres of vines, the Camp Four Vineyard, planted with 19 different grape varieties. While honoring existing contracts for the fruit (one-third of it goes to the Parker family’s brands, while most of the rest is sold to about 70 small producers from all around the state), the Chumash started making their own wine, and released their first vintages of Kitá Wines last month.

While the project is the latest in a small but growing number of Native American tribes entering the wine business—including three in Northern California, one in Arizona, and one in British Columbia—the Chumash are the first to tap one of their own to run the show: Tara Gomez, the 40-year-old daughter of the tribe’s vice chairman, is the first head winemaker of Native American descent on the continent.
Read on …

Advertisements
American rapper Nicki Minaj.

American rapper Nicki Minaj.

 

Outspoken American rapper Nicki Minaj is the latest to profit from the ‘Moscato madness’ boom in the US, having become part owner of Moscato brand Myx Fusions.

The songwriter and TV star, known for her outlandish outfits, has been made the face of the brand, which specialises in fruit-infused single serve Moscato.

“I’m so excited to team with Myx. I have no doubt that it will be number one.

“It’s a great tasting product that people will love. It’s not even a hard sell. Myx Fusions gives us an opportunity to revolutionise the wine industry,” she said.

Priced at $4 bottle, Myx Fusions is currently available in New York, Los Angeles and Las Vegas, and there are plans to roll out the Moscato across the US.
The Myx Fusions range
“The collaboration between Nicki Minaj and Myx Fusions is a game changer,” said Mona Scott-Young, chief marketing officer for the brand.

Read on …

Sunday night saw the 47th Superbowl take place at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome in New Orleans.

The Baltimore Ravens beat the San Francisco 49ers by 34-31 in a thrilling climax to the American Football season.

The commercials that are televised during the match have almost become as famous as the game itself and Sunday night’s match saw a new batch of adverts released.

As the official beer partner AB InBev is the only company to advertise beer during the Superbowl, but Budweiser, Beck’s and Bud Light all featured and here’s a look at some of the adverts that were aired this year.

Read on …

Guns and now fine wine.

Guns and now fine wine.

Wine enthusiasts can now indulge their passion and back the right to bear arms at the same time by joining the National Rifle Association of America’s Wine Club.
‘Now you can support the 2nd Amendment with every wine you buy’ runs the strapline on the homepage of the club, nrawineclub.com, which also offers new members a ‘nine-piece custom NRA engraved wine box’ when they join.
Read on …

Kids and Booze!

Kids and Booze!

 

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) plans this summer to recommend ways that the alcoholic beverage industry can better protect underage viewers from seeing its advertisements online.

Distillers, brewers and wineries pour millions of dollars into brand promotion on Twitter, Facebook and other social media, and industry critics contend they are not doing enough to prevent young consumers from receiving these messages.

 “We’re doing a deep dive on how they’re using the Internet and social media,” said Janet Evans, a lawyer with the FTC, which is conducting a year-long study due to be released by early summer. “We’re focusing on underage exposure.”

She would not elaborate on any potential recommendations that might come out of the study, which began in April 2012.
Read on …

Also read:

 

Celebrities, like Rihanna, is a big fan of the Cattier’s Armand de Brignac label.

Celebrities, like Rihanna, is a big fan of the Cattier’s Armand de Brignac label.

 

Speaking to the drinks business last week, Cattier’s commercial director Philippe Bienvenu said that the house would definitely be bottling a single vineyard varietal Pinot Meunier from the 2012 vintage.

As previously reported by db, the Champagne will be bottled under Cattier’s Armand de Brignac label, famous for its gold packaging, high prices, large formats, and association with celebrities, most notably American rapper Jay-Z.

The grapes for the upcoming Champagne come from a 1.1 hectare walled vineyard called Clos Yons, situated between Chigny-les-Roses and Rilly-la-Montagne, which is planted exclusively with Pinot Meunier.
Read on …

 

The US wine industry report.

The US wine industry report.

 

Silicon Valley Bank’s annual State of the Wine Industry Report forecasts 4-8% sales growth in wine for 2013. The report identifies trends and addresses current issues facing the U.S. wine industry, offering data and observations that help that wineries can use to develop their business strategies.

Silicon Valley Bank’s wine report is based on its in-house expertise as one of the largest bankers to the West Coast wine industry for nearly 20 years, a proprietary database of more than a decade of winery financials, ongoing research, and an annual survey of 450 West Coast wineries.

 

Read on…

 

Click to download a PDF of the report:

 

Click thumbnail to view the full-size infographic

Click thumbnail to view the full-size infographic

 

 

The magical world of a barrel cellar.

The magical world of a barrel cellar.

 

I have often wondered why winemakers put their wines, white or red, in oak barrels and age them for sometimes months at a time.

The University of California Davis recently conducted a seminar on oak management and wine sensory issues. It looked at the use of oak barrels and oak adjuvants such as oak staves and oak powder with regard to how the oak may affect the wine’s chemical composition, aroma and flavors.

To me, the aroma of a wine is the “smell” of the specific grape varietal. But this very sensitive element can be easily influenced by the winemaking techniques and the use of oak barrels.

One obvious question is: why were oak barrels chosen to store wine in the beginning? The barrel is a perfect container to age wine in and is easily moved around manually. The answer seems to be related to the fact that oak barrels do not leak if properly coopered.

One of the most intriguing questions that was discussed at this seminar was what would have been the impact on wine tastes and wine’s appeal if a different tree had been chosen for barrel production. Has the effects of the oak barrel basically defined our tastes for different styles of wine?

Most European oak barrels are made from the Quercus petrea or Quercus robur while Quercus alba or the white oak is the main species used in American oak barrels. Today a good French oak barrel sells for around $1,000 a barrel and many of these barrels can only be used for several years before they lose their ability to enhance the flavors of the wine.

Read on …

What should you drink with Big Macs or pizza? An expert analyzes the basic flavor components of America’s favorite fast foods and suggests the perfect wines for each one.

 

Fast food and wine?

Fast food and wine?

At the end of my last trip to France, my cheap, no-brand rental car broke down on my way out of Paris, directly in front of a large—and hugely busy—McDonald’s. Fate, I felt, had finally poked its finger in my back. In the nearly 20 years I’d been traveling through Europe, I had managed never to set foot in a single fast-food restaurant. This wasn’t out of some highbrow pretense, mind you—when stateside, I visit my local White Castle so often they give me my change in shares of stock. It just seemed philosophically boneheaded to eat the same food over there that I could get back home. Yet there I was, stuck in front of that familiar yellow-and-red “billions and billions” sign. It was dinnertime and I was hungry. And I wasn’t going anywhere soon.

I walked through curtains of Gauloises smoke and up to the counter, where in my best 10th-grade French I requested: “Un Big Mac, un Royal avec fromage (a Quarter Pounder with Cheese), des frites,” and—because I couldn’t resist sampling what the corporate palates had chosen to complement their cuisine—a couple of tiny bottles of vin rouge et vin blanc.

I sat there for two hours, guiltily picking at the burgers and fries, swirling and sipping the wines from little plastic cups. I was, by the way, the only one swirling and sipping anything in that place—and for good reason. Both wines were mediocre at best and actually tasted worse with the food than alone. The burgers and fries were fine.

This experience taught me two very important lessons: It doesn’t pay to drive a low-rent voiture, and the French don’t know jack about matching wine with fast food.
Read on …

New device allows the user to directly inhale alcohol – increasing the effects on the body
Experts have warned that the Vaportini – which is available to buy online – could be used by impressionable and inexperienced teenagers
Parents have been warned of the dangers of a simple new device freely available online which heats alcohol and allows it to be inhaled – reportedly giving the user an instant but intense high.


Released in December, the $35 Vaportini acts in a manner similar to a traditional vaporizer, heating and releasing intoxicating vapors which are breathed through a straw after being heated by a candle to 140 Fahreneheit.
Bypassing the digestive system, the Vaportini causes alcohol to be ingested directly to the bloodstream through the lungs, potentially causing dangerous levels of intoxication – especially if abused.
Read on …

Also read: