Posts Tagged ‘Are’

Drinking for pleasure...

Drinking for pleasure…

 
As the Chinese economy slows, new figures confirm that Chinese consumers are seeking out less expensive wine brands.

 
Analysts Wine Intelligence found that in the first quarter of this year, 60% of consumers between the ages of 18 and 50 spent less than CNY200 (€25) on imported wine.

€25 is generally recognised as entry-level wine in China. An earlier survey in January this year had found that fear of buying a fake wine was the biggest barrier to entry for imported wines, with 44% of respondents saying it put them off buying.

‘There is a growing trend for drinking wine for pleasure rather than serving it at banquets or giving it as gifts,’ Maria Troein, China manager for Wine Intelligence told China Daily.
Read on …

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Google Analytics are awesome.

They’re free, easy to set up, and tell you everything you need to know about how your website is performing.

But, they also encompass a confusing array of data, can be time-consuming to set up, and involve a dictionary of Google-speak.  (What is a visit versus a pageview anyway?)

Don’t worry if you don’t have hours to dive into this.  Here are three key stats to look at to see if your site is on track at the highest level.

Mobile %
The percentage of website traffic coming from mobile devices jumped from 17.5% in Q3 2012 to 23.1% in Q4 2012, according to a new report from Walker Sands.  On the Vin65 platform, our clients average about 17%.  To find out what yours is:

1.Select Audience
2.Select Mobile
3.Select Overview
4.Choose your viewing option.  We chose the pie chart.
Implication? This example shows a smaller viewership – only 4.4% are on mobile.  But if you are one of the wineries where 1 out of every 5 of your customers are on a mobile device, you better make sure that your mobile site and cart are optimized or you could be losing valuable sales.

To take this a step further, drill down to remove iPads.  Why?  Because iPads are “mobile” in the Google Analytics world but tend to use computer monitor resolution.  So if you’re trying to see if you need to redesign your site for the small screen, this is important.

To do this:

1.Select Devices
2.Select advanced search
3.Select Exclude, then choose Mobile Device Info
4.Type in iPad

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Around four million adults in the UK currently brew their own beer or wine at home, according to the financial advice website, http://www.allaboutmoney.com/.
The research found that around 8% of us either regularly or occasionally make our own beer or wine, and another 24% have done so in the past. According to All About Money the practice of home brewing can cost drinkers less than a tenth of the price of a pint down the pub.

Ian Williams of All About Money commented: “When you’re looking for ways to save money, a nice pint after work is probably the last thing you want to give up. But our research shows you can have that pint and save money, and you might just have fun doing it too.

“There’s no substitute for a good pint in your favourite pub or restaurant, but there’s a lot to be said for enjoying something you’ve put your own time and effort into making.”

Read on …

 

Obsessive-Compulsive? Hedonistic? Or just carefree?

 

“There may be more to learn by climbing the same mountain a hundred times than by climbing a hundred different mountains.”—Richard Nelson, The Island Within

It all began while I was making one of my favorite dishes, a lemon risotto. I make it often, if only because risotto is kind of a signature dish chez Kramer, especially when we’re entertaining.

Now, making risotto is not that hard. But I’ve discovered that a good number of otherwise adept cooks are daunted by risotto because a certain “know when to hold ’em, know when to fold ’em” sense of—to borrow from wine terminology—ideal ripeness is involved. It’s not that hard. But a little repetition helps.

While making the risotto I thought of author Richard Nelson’s observation cited above. And that, in turn, made me think about wine loving.

We all know an awful lot of wine lovers. They’re winemakers, sommeliers, winery owners, restaurateurs and, not least, our fellow wine-loving friends. If you want to get a sense of just how persuasive wine is in your life, give a thought to how many of your friends don’t drink wine. My guess is that, apart from a handful who abstain from alcohol altogether
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The now well-scientifically-established French Paradox — which has driven a wine/health craze since the pivotal 60 Minutes Episode on Nov. 17, 1991 — is all about moderate consumption.

Red wine sales increased 44% after the broadcast … dropped off a bit, then soared again a year later when the program was re-broadcast. As a whole, per-capita consumption in the U.S was in decline until then. And has been on the upswing ever since.

However, wine industry neglect and government guessing, has made the defining of “moderate” an unclear and, perhaps, unhealthy situation.

What’s Moderate? What’s A Drink?

And are you a drunk and don’t know it?

WHAT IS MODERATE DRINKING?

The biggest problem with defining this level concerns how researchers and government agencies gather data.

In general, the vast majority of the hundreds of peer-reviewed scientific studies define “moderate” as 1 drink a day for women and no more than two. For men, that range is 1 to 2 drinks a day but no more than 3 or 4. Weekly consumption for “moderate” is 7 for women and no more than 14 for men.

This site: from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) offers the current definition of Moderate & Binge Drinking. While NIAAA receives almost half a billion dollars per year in tax funds, as far as can be determined, they have never conducted studies on the health benefits of moderate consumption.

That may seem unfair, but they are in keeping with other government-sponsored alcohol organizations including those at the United Nations.

DATA COLLECTION ISSUES PLAGUE “STANDARDIZATION”

The definitions of “moderate” and “binge” are somewhat based on the extensive research showing that moderate drinkers of alcohol live longer and more illness-free lives than either heavy drinkers or abstainers (with corrections for abstainers who do not drink because of illness or other health issues).

However, those definitions are based on self-reported consumption data from alcohol consumers who may underestimate the number of drinks they consume. In addition, most drinkers do not have a precise idea of exactly what constitutes “a drink.”

In the absence of hard data in large population studies in hundreds of scientific papers, government agencies have basically made a wild guess and decided that the “standard” is one that contains a very small amount of alcohol — 14 grams.

This is a timeworn bureaucratic technique: when the facts aren’t available, make one up.

And thus, the “standard” drink was invented based on a guess with no solid facts at all.

But like so many government pronouncements — especially when UNchallenged by private parties — this bureaucratic invention of convenience has achieved the level of dogma.

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Are you a wine geek?

Are you a wine geek?

8 Signs That You Might Be a Wine Geek

Want to know if you’ve reached wine geekdom?
 
Being wine smart is awesome, but it has its drawbacks. Some of these drawbacks include strange incessant wine habits. If you’ve caught yourself doing any of the following, you might be a wine geek.

You Might be a Wine Geek if…

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Fancy some Korean fermented cabbage? Or how about oxcheek doughnuts?
It’s not only clothes that have trends — food is just as susceptible to the fickle world of fashion.

Here, Daily Mail food writer ANNE SHOOTER gives her predictions for the hottest foods of 2013… 

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