Posts Tagged ‘Avoid’

Photo: © Europen Parliament/P.Naj-Oleari pietro.naj-oleari@europarl.europa.eu

 

Experts have claimed that many deaths from alcohol-related liver disease could be avoided and that doctors are “missing opportunities” to help people with alcohol problems.
The new report, by the National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcome and Death (NCEPOD), saw researchers examine detailed patient notes of 385 patients who died from alcohol-related liver disease across England Wales and Northern Ireland.

They found 135 cases of “missed opportunities” to help improve the patient’s health outcome and as many as 32 of the deaths could have been avoided. The report added that only half of the cases reviewed received “good care”.

 

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At the roots of organic wine ...

At the roots of organic wine …

 

“Do you offer organic wine?” It’s a question I hear frequently while on the wine trail.

Wine retailers, once cautious about the idea are suddenly eager to stock organic wine. A smattering of selections has burgeoned in recent years, crowding store displays. Once on the fringe, brands featuring words like nature, earth and the prefix “eco” now edge closer to the wine mainstream as consumer interest intensifies. But the simple question remains: which wines labeled as organic are really worth a look?

Not many, it turns out. Wine brands marketed as organic are seldom worth bringing home again. It’s unusual to find a drinkable red — with Organic splashed across the front label — which begs another taste.

For supporters of organic consumption, there’s a bright side; one you’ll find useful if you support some notion of organic farming and expect well-made wine to boot.

The far more exciting end of organic viticulture is the juice made from organically farmed grapes — from France, Italy and Spain, as well as from domestic producers — where organic may be barely noticeable on labels. It’s wine sold on the merits of taste and authenticity first. Validating these wines requires reading fine print, or decoding unfamiliar symbols. Quite a few estates feature organic production without fanfare or gaudy marketing campaigns. The challenge is finding them.

In the 1980s, the fledging category began to appear in stores, with wines from California among the first examples available in mass distribution. Initially the concept raised a murmur of excitement, in part because organics were considered healthier options than conventional versions. People bought organic wine as they did food, mostly to avoid a perceived surplus of chemical herbicides, pesticides, fertilizers and other additives thought to be common in conventionally made wine. From the outset, however, customers encountered unstable, highly variable bottles. Many of the wines were hard to identify from the varietals listed on the labels. Opening the early organic bottles was like spinning a roulette wheel — one bottle stinky and cloudy, another one browning, dull, others grapey but odd examples. Moreover, the wines were expensive for the times. Organic wine seemed more an experiment than a reliable new category. Consumers had every right to worry about chemical additives in winemaking, but it remained that bottles had to taste as good, or better than conventional versions.

 

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Prevention better than cure!

Prevention better than cure!

Prevention is better than cure, they say. It’s all well and good curing a hangover, but wouldn’t it be better not to have it in the first place?

1. Know your limits and stick to them.

The hard reality is that seventy five percent of people who imbibe alcohol to intoxication will have a hangover the next day. A hangover is nature’s way of clearing the toxins in alcohol from your body, so the more you pour in, the nastier the hangover will be. The number of alcoholic beverages it takes to reach a state of intoxication varies from person to person and knowing your own limits is important. It’s recommended in some places that you don’t have more than three beverages in any 1 to 2 hour period, and no more than five beverages in one night.
If you’re a woman or of Asian descent, you might want to consider having a little less because your metabolism makes you more susceptible to hangovers. Women tend to have a lower metabolic rate due to a higher ratio of body fat and Asians tend to have lower levels of alcohol dehydrogenase, an enzyme that breaks down alcohol. Pay attention to how different types of alcohol affect you. No matter what the studies say, every person’s ability to metabolize alcohol differs and you’ll know by experience which beer, wine, spirit, or liqueur works for you or plays havoc with your body. Listen to your own body’s reactions and take care accordingly.

Keep in mind that regardless of all the following suggestions, the key solution to hangover prevention is always paying attention to quantity – the less alcohol consumed, the better your chances of avoiding a hangover. Unless you are intending to get really drunk, try drinking one standard drink (can of beer, shot of hard liquor)per hour, which is about the rate at which your liver can keep up. For most people, the most pleasant moment is when the first one kicks in (BAL around .05), and drinking more at that time just moves you away from the “sweet spot.” At one per hour, your blood alcohol level will tend to stay in that range, resulting in more pleasant feeling and less likelihood of doing something stupid.

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The morning after!

The morning after!

Choose white wine rather than red, vodka rather than brandy, and eat before drinking.

Forget strong coffee, cold showers, physical exercise, artichokes, the teaspoon of olive oil before the meal, and all of Grandma’s other recipes: there is no miracle cure for post-party hangovers.

Ninety percent of the French plan to consume alcohol on New Year’s Eve, according to a road safety survey, so New Year’s Day may be a widespread problem.

Dry mouth, jackhammer in the head, upset stomach, nausea, dizziness, dehydration – a hangover does not occur during the evening but several hours later, when the level of alcohol in the blood decreases. It reaches a maximum when the alcohol level reaches zero.

A hangover may occur after consumption of just one glass, with women generally less “resistant” to alcohol than men, but it affects almost everyone beyond five glasses.

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