Posts Tagged ‘Better’

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Swedish alcohol supplier said the country’s state-run liquor monopoly sent back 6,000 bottles of a Spanish wine because it tasted better than the samples.

Kare Hallden, chief executive officer of alcohol supplier Spruce Up, said state-run liquor store monopoly Systembolaget chose to stock Spanish albarino wine Fulget after choosing its samples over 50 competitors in March, The Local.se reported Friday.

However, Hallden said the store sent the 6,000 bottles back to the company in May because the wine delivered was “clearly better” than the March samples.

 

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The middle class knows best ...

The middle class knows best …

 

Middle class professionals who drink at home are the country’s biggest problem drinkers because they think they know better than health experts, new research claims.
The study found widespread evidence that white collar workers consider alcohol – especially wine – an everyday reward for chores such as cooking dinner or putting their children to bed, as well as to combat the stress of office life.

There was also a common perception among the group that they could ignore health warnings and that regularly drinking at home is safe and sensible, even if their intake exceeded recommended guidelines.

The researchers claim the study shows the need for an overhaul of the government’s messages about safe drinking, which currently focus more on the impact of binge drinking and anti-social behaviour.

In fact, the study – in the journal BMC – found that these public health warnings “actively reinforced” the view among the middle classes “that their own drinking was problem-free”, because the campaigns tended to depict problems associated with young people drinking.

The research, by the universities of Newcastle and Sunderland, involved a study among 49 clerical and managerial staff from a range of workplaces, including a council, a tax office and a chemical storage company.
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Every year members of the Union des Grands Crus de Bordeaux present wines in San Francisco, Chicago and New York. Their visit is one of the high points on calendars in major markets and is jammed with portfolio showings, regional and individual winery tastings.

 

The promotion by the premier growths of Bordeaux comes after months of preparation by staffers at Balzac Communications and Marketing in California. Organizers follow a 10-page battle plan that covers client goals, site selection, budgets, consumer and charity partners, invitations, tasting books, stemware, badges, trade and media lists, staffing and a long roster of peripherals. Many planners work with similar templates, smaller or equally detailed.

The success of a wine event starts with planning and a clear understanding of goals. The failures can often be traced to poor advance work and faulty follow through. The pitfalls are many, and catastrophes can happen. Here, marketing and event planning professionals offer their wisdom on planning the perfect wine event:

Things Do Go Wrong
All too frequently, wines, particularly those that must clear customs, are not available though they are listed on the program. Sometimes exhibitors do not know the wholesale or retail prices, speakers talk too long, or event sites are not ready on time. Melanie Young of The Connected Table in New York offered a litany of things that can make a presentation go sour.

“When you enter a poorly organized event, the room lacks professional ambiance. Registration is in disarray, there is no one to greet and direct guests and no helpful signage. No spit buckets. Cheap glassware that smells like dishwasher fluid. Tasting books that lack critical information or lines for writing notes, seminar handouts with no suggested pricing, poorly prepared literature that will only be tossed out afterwards,” she said.
“I’ve been to tastings with fragrant flowers and pourers wearing perfume. I’ve seen events where no one understands the need to serve product at the right temperature—white wine too cold or too warm and red wine that needed to be decanted—servers not briefed and unable to answer basic questions,” said Young.

Sam Folsom of Folsom Associates in San Francisco recalls arriving at a restaurant where the room was not prepared. “Our guests stood around waiting for staff to arrive and watched while they scrambled to set tables,” he said.

Be especially wary of large amounts of alcohol available at big consumer events, warns Aileen Robbins of the Dunn Robbins Group in New York. “When people pay to attend a tasting they really don’t want to ask questions about the terroir, they want to drink and eat as much as possible in the allotted time,” she observed. “I’ve seen inebriation, people who’ve fallen down stairs, passed out and wine glasses shattering after being dropped from upper floors.

On the other hand, having too few patrons can cause its own problems. “On another occasion, so few people showed up at a tasting that I was tempted to have waiters put on their street clothes and come back as guest,” Robbins said.

“Long ago,” comments Marsha Palanci of Cornerstone Communications in New York, “ I learned not to take anything for granted. We organized a vertical tasting at a Manhattan hotel and were assured that we did not need to rent stemware. When we arrived, we found a mix of six Riedel stems and six margarita glasses. We got rid of the Margaritas, and had guests empty, rinse and reuse their original glasses after the first go-around.”

Robbins added. “Once, a site manager locked us out because the client hadn’t paid the balance of the bill. Management refused to open the doors at starting time until we found a valid credit card to cover the amount.”

 

When Planning Works
Former sommelier Evan Goldstein directs Full Circle Wine Solutions. At a recent Full Circle tasting for Argentine wines at Cork Buzz, a popular venue in New York, guests first attended a seminar led by presenter Keith Goldston, master sommelier. Goldston lectured on Argentine wines, conducted a sampling of selected bottlings and orchestrated a lunch with matching wines, followed by a walk around tasting.

Each guest received a pamphlet detailing the wines and the wineries, harvest report, bottling details, tasting notes and suggested retail prices as well as the menu for the luncheon. The preparation was complete, down to spit cups for each participant, often an overlooked, emergency entry at tastings. Goldston had toured Argentine wine country, knew the wines and the vineyards and was able to answer all questions with ease.

“Planning is a complicated dance—you have to balance what you know will work with what your client wants and can pay for,” says Honora Horan, principal of HH Communications in Manhattan. “You have to get ‘good’ attendees: accredited, knowledgeable writers and appropriate wine buyers, sommeliers and retailers. There has to be something for the journalists to write about and wines that will appeal to the trade.”
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Red wine is good for you!

A natural ingredient found in red wine, resveratrol, can help fight off diseases associated with age, a new study shows.
Resveratrol, found in the skin of grapes, has long been touted for its anti-ageing properties.
Researchers are studying this natural compound to help them design better anti-aging drugs.
They think it works by increasing the activity of sirtuins, a family of proteins found throughout the body, which are believed to combat diseases related to getting older, like type 2 diabetes, cancer or Alzheimer’s. Specifically, resveratrol increases the activity of SIRT1, which acts to make our mitochondria — the cell part that turns food into energy in our cells — more efficient, the study says.
The direct link between resveratrol and the SIRT1 protein has been made before, both by the lead author of this latest paper, Harvard genetics professor David Sinclair, and others.
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Women who drink red wine enjoy better sex lives, an Italian university study has suggested

Women who drink red wine enjoy better sex lives, an Italian university study has suggested

Women who drink red wine enjoy better sex lives, a study from the University of Florence in Italy has suggested.

A study among Tuscan women discovered that one or two glasses a day could lead to a more fulfilling life in the bedroom.

Experts from the university questioned 800 women between 18 and 50 Santa Maria Annunziata Hospital about their sexual satisfaction.

Using the Female Sexual Function Index – which is used by doctors to assess women and sexual health – it emerged that drinkers scored higher than teetotallers.
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Why organic food tastes worse to some
“The halo effect hinges on the values of the perceiver”

 

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Labeling food as “organic” may not always lead to a positive impression in the minds of consumers, according to a recent Cornell University study.
The research flips the notion of a “halo” effect for ethical food labels. A halo effect refers to a phenomenon where a label leads consumers to have a positive opinion – and in the case of an organic label, a healthful impression – of those foods.
The Cornell research finds that such positive impressions are partly based on the personal values of a consumer. The two-part study found that some conditions can produce a negative impression of organic labels among consumers, due to the consumer’s values.
In the first part, Jonathon Schuldt, Cornell assistant professor of communication, and Mary Hannahan, a student at the University of Michigan, asked 215 students whether they thought organic food was healthier and tastier than conventional food. While most agreed that organics were a healthy choice compared with conventional food, fewer expected organic food to taste good by comparison. This latter finding was especially true for… read on