Posts Tagged ‘Biggest’

 

South Africa is looking at its biggest ever harvest this year despite a late and slow start to the growing season.

According to the South African Wine Industry Information and Systems (SAWIS), the 2013 grape crop is expected to hit 1,491,432 tons, exceeding the 2012 crop by 5.4% and larger than the last biggest harvest, 2008, by over 4%.

The overall harvest therefore –including juice, concentrate and wines for brandy and distilling – will reach over 1m litres, with an average 773 litres per ton of grapes.

In terms of quality, producers “are excited about a promising crop”, with good colour, structure and flavour particularly in the reds.
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British air passengers have been voted the heaviest drinkers according to a survey of 700 international cabin crew by Skyscanner.
Holidaying Brits beat the Russians into second place according to the travel site, which also polled UK passengers for their reaction to the concept of alcohol-free flights.

According to Skyscanner research, over half of Brits admit to starting their holiday with a drink either in the airport or onboard the plane.

However, 41% of respondents said they would book an alcohol-free flight should it be offered – with a quarter of those saying that this was to avoid the risk of sharing a plane with drunken passengers.

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1. A picture-perfect year.

In Napa Valley, 2012 was a perfect year for growing wine grapes: Mild temperatures with no heat spikes, no rain during critical times including at harvest time, few bugs, fungus or other pests. With high quality and quantity, it’s a perfect year for growers and wineries and should lead to excellent wines and good prices for consumers.

2. The shortage that didn’t occur.

Observers predicted a shortage of grapes this year due to lack of planting in recent years, but growers left a few extra buds on the vines and dropped fewer clusters than usual, leading to a bounteous harvest. There’s no indication that the slightly greater yields harmed quality, either, though only time will tell.

3. Buying wine gets easier, albeit slowly.

It’s slowly getting easier to buy wine by mail as states reduce restrictions, and more and more states are killing blue laws and other rules that date to Prohibition. Direct sales to consumers from wineries reached $1.4 billion according to Wines & Vines, a leading trade magazine. This is especially important to Napa’s boutique wineries, that have trouble getting adequate distribution through traditional wholesalers – and make far more money from selling direct.
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usa-wine

 

Bragging rights aside, the country’s metropolitan areas differ greatly in their consumption of wines. Often, we see consumption expressed as gallons per capita. That measure doesn’t tell the whole story, though.

The “gallons” in gallons per capita are usually “all wines”, which includes sparkling wines, dessert wines and specially-flavored natural wines in addition to the table wines we think about. Table wines are still (no spritz) wines of no more than 14% alcohol. What’s that? You say you’ve been enjoying red table wines with more than 14% alcohol? Where are they classified? Well, as far as the federal government is concerned, those are dessert wines and are taxed at a higher rate than table wines. For wine marketers, however, those high alcohol wines are usually thought of as being table wines because they are displayed on the shelf alongside all of the other table wines and are sold the same as table wines.
The ratios differ from city-to-city, but the typical relationship is: table wine accounts for 87-88% of all wines. In the northeast and Midwest states, Champagne is still part of many cultural traditions, so the table wines share would be lower than elsewhere.

The bar chart (Figure 1) shows the top 20 metropolitan areas of America in estimated volume of table winesconsumed during 2011. Los Angeles-Long Beach-Riverside and New York-northern New Jersey-Long Island are in a class by themselves.
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