Posts Tagged ‘brand’

American rapper Nicki Minaj.

American rapper Nicki Minaj.

 

Outspoken American rapper Nicki Minaj is the latest to profit from the ‘Moscato madness’ boom in the US, having become part owner of Moscato brand Myx Fusions.

The songwriter and TV star, known for her outlandish outfits, has been made the face of the brand, which specialises in fruit-infused single serve Moscato.

“I’m so excited to team with Myx. I have no doubt that it will be number one.

“It’s a great tasting product that people will love. It’s not even a hard sell. Myx Fusions gives us an opportunity to revolutionise the wine industry,” she said.

Priced at $4 bottle, Myx Fusions is currently available in New York, Los Angeles and Las Vegas, and there are plans to roll out the Moscato across the US.
The Myx Fusions range
“The collaboration between Nicki Minaj and Myx Fusions is a game changer,” said Mona Scott-Young, chief marketing officer for the brand.

Read on …

Boom go the millenials…

 

John’s Grocery in Iowa City is an upscale wine retailer whose customers include doctors and employees of the nearby University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine. As such, says wine buyer Wally Plahutnik, his customers are knowledgeable and service oriented, regardless of age and demographic. Except for one very intriguing thing.

“I can’t get the older ones to use the camera on their phone to take a picture of the wine label,” he says. “The younger ones, no problem. But the older customers still come in and tell me they had a bottle of wine, but can’t remember the name. And when I ask them why they don’t use the camera, they just sort of look at me.”

In this, Plahutnik is in the middle of one of the biggest changes the wine business has ever seen—the revolution in consumer demographics, of which the role of new technology is just one small part. The Baby Boomers, born between 1948 and 1962 and widely regarded as the best friend that retailers and restaurateurs ever had, are becoming increasingly less important in the marketplace. Their replacement? The Millennials, two generations behind them but already numerically more significant among core wine drinkers, according to the 2012 Wine Market Council report. Though the Boomers make up 38% of wine drinkers, they consume only 32% of the wine. The numbers for Millennials are 29% and 38%.

 More broadly, Boomers will account for less than 20 percent of the U.S. population over the next eight years, and the number of Baby Boomers younger than 60 will fall by more than two-thirds, according to a 2012 study by Jeffries-Alix Partners. Meanwhile, Millennials (born between the early 1980s and the early 2000s) older than 25 will make up almost one-fifth of the country’s population. And that doesn’t take into account the 8 million Millennials who will turn 21 and start buying wine over the next three years.

“The Boomers are famous for consuming more stuff than anyone else in history,” says Dan Graham, a vice president with the Dechert-Hampe marketing consultancy in southern California. “The question is not so much whether the Millennials will be like them, but how to reach them, since they’re so different from the Boomers.”

The key is understanding—or, first, trying to identify—those differences. It’s one thing to market to Millennials with cute wine names or to approach them through social media because they use it, but that doesn’t mean it’s going to work. The Millennials may not be as jaundiced as their older cousins, the Gen Xers (born between born the mid-1960s and the early 1980s) about marketing, but they’re still more wary than the Boomers.

Also important, and often overlooked: Any discussion of the Millennials must take into account three things. First, that since the end of World War II, the U.S. economy experienced unprecedented growth. Will that continue? Many of the projections on Millennial spending assume they’ll have the same economic opportunities that the Boomers did, and that may not be the case given what appear to be major structural changes in the U.S. economy (to say nothing of ongoing wrangling about government spending).

Second, the Millennials are saddled with $1 trillion in college debt, which could limit their spending in a way that didn’t bother the two older demographics. One guess is that the Millennials’ penchant for low-cost social events like Wine Riot and the success of companies like Groupon represent evidence that they want to go out but can’t afford the bars and clubs that the Gen Xers and Boomers could.

Third, says John Gillespie, president of Wine Market Council, there appear to be some differences between younger Millennials, ages 21-28, and those 28 -36. The latter, he says, act more like Boomers—more willing to spend money, for instance. The younger group may change as it ages, too, but no one knows for sure.

Moving forward, every business looking to capture Millennial dollars needs to know what sets them apart from the Boomers—things that take into account not just demographic but economic and cultural differences:

 

Read on …

Also read:

usual-suspects-line-up

 

 

If you are like me, you get offers of reports on trends in the wine business about every day. Several years ago I saw a synopsis of an extensive report that seemed pretty interesting. For the mere price of $2,500US I had a several hundred page report on my desk in about a week. Now this was when I still had an expense account so please don’t start emailing me more sucker offers.

 

Click to enlarge!

Click to enlarge!

 

Sadly, much of the report seemed like it was written by a fresh-out-of-college student, or at a minimum someone who never lived in the wine business. It was rehash of everything you already knew. To make matters worse, I was cited in several places for things I’d said. That instantly devalued the purchase. Why would I listen to me? I always lie.
One of the largest issues in a family owned winery is getting your message out in a way that impacts your customers and prospective customers, helps deliver the right message in a way they hear it, and create an emotional connection with your brand. There is no way you can do that one customer at a time. Its not scalable. And while going with the standard cohorts of Millennials/GenX etc is tempting, that isn’t going to be very effective in the end because of the wide variance in tastes within the cohorts. So you have to find a way to segment your customers and prospective customers into groups so you can then customize a message for that group. That is scalable but it requires defining the groups and individual characteristics of the groups as well as their motivations. If you can do that, then you can do direct marketing and even events with like-minded people.

Read on …

Also read:

Wine is on the rise.

Wine is on the rise.

The Wine Market Council finds that wine drinking has expanded to more venues.
Amid a still-challenging economic environment, wine sales continued to grow in 2012, according to the Wine Market Council—an independent, nonprofit trade association—and The Nielsen Company, which presented their annual findings on U.S. consumer trends in wine. Key discoveries included:

Not just for fancy restaurants. Wine drinkers are finding more occasions suitable for consuming wine, including less traditional venues like ball games or concerts. That said, restaurant patronage has increased since the downturn in the 2008–2009 recession, and wine consumption at expensive restaurants has rebounded along with that. An increase in wine consumption at casual chain restaurants, including quick service restaurants, also was observed.

“The story isn’t just more wine drinkers,” said John Gillespie, President of the Wine Market Council, “but that they are drinking wine much more frequently, and that’s what’s driving growth.” Particularly among Millennials and Generation Xers, “wine is finding its way into places and times we thought were previously unavailable.”

Read on …

Also read:

Smart ways to build your brand!

Smart ways to build your brand!

 

These days a wine cork is more than just a simple wine closure — corks are a creative way for wineries to build their brand. Imprints on wine corks vary from informational to just plain entertaining!

Corks are a perfect place for wineries to promote their websites and social media. King Estate was one of the first (if not the first) to use their corks to publicize their twitter handle.
Kendall-Jackson chose to highlight their choice of Nomacorc’s synthetic wine corks by imprinting their corks with founder Jess Jackson’s statement, “I selected this cork to ensure the highest wine quality.”
Read on …

Designing wine labels for the Millennial Generation.

Designing wine labels for the Millennial Generation.

 

The more inimitable and attractive a wine label design is the greater chance the bottle has of being purchased. It is widely believed that wine label art is reflective of the quality of the wine inside.
The double purchase

The artistic appeal of wine bottle labels initiates the first purchase, while the quality of the wine initiates a second purchase. Wine labels are no longer used to only communicate information about variety or winery but are used as a wine marketing tactic to attract potential buyers.

Differentiate your wine label design

With thousands of wines – local and international, hundreds of brands, and then the multiple varieties, palettes and packaging options available, it has made browsing wine isles quite overwhelming. It seems vital that within the highly competitive wine market, wineries would differentiate themselves as much as possible.

Wine is fashion

Someone once said, “Wine is fashion, and beverage aisles are our runway. Wines, like fashion, have reached a point where marketing and merchandising play as important a role as making the product itself.”

Wine bottle labels are essentially marketing billboards, which makes it all the more important for wine producers to understand their target market and design the label appropriately.

Baby Boomers

(Baby Boomers: born beginning in 1946 until end of 1964.) It seems clear that most wine marketers have spent the majority of their focus on the Baby Boomer population, and quite rightly so, but there is a market that has a larger buying power and is being largely ignored.
Read on …

 

Also read:

'Global' beer brands.

‘Global’ beer brands.

 

Despite hundreds of attempts, only a select few beer brands have made the successful transition from local to global.

 

Kos Apostolatos, David Atkinson and Joseph Poore from management consultancy firm Marakon examine the successes and failures of global brand building in beer, market dynamics and best practices across the FMCG sector.

Freddy Heineken, the grandson of Heineken founder Gerard Heineken, started his career with the family company in 1942 and became Chairman of the Board in 1971. Freddy was an eccentric man and a noted salesman who fell in love with American advertising and marketing. He was extremely focused on consumers, very hands-on and rightly credited with the creation of the Heineken brand “personality.”

When Freddy became chairman of the Board, he pushed hard to expand Heineken beyond its local origins. Although Freddy had a dream to build a global beer brand, what people often don’t know is that he did not have any formal marketing education or detailed knowledge. His approach was primarily entrepreneurial and instinctive.

He did, however, understand that the Heineken brand had the potential to be unique among other beers and decided to put Heineken on the global map. His line of thinking was fivefold:

– Appeal to the young adult consumer

– Position the brand as premium and hip

– Create a green bottle with “export” on the label

– Craft a beer with superior and consistent taste

– Make it globally available
Read on …