Posts Tagged ‘Chinese’

Drinking for pleasure...

Drinking for pleasure…

 
As the Chinese economy slows, new figures confirm that Chinese consumers are seeking out less expensive wine brands.

 
Analysts Wine Intelligence found that in the first quarter of this year, 60% of consumers between the ages of 18 and 50 spent less than CNY200 (€25) on imported wine.

€25 is generally recognised as entry-level wine in China. An earlier survey in January this year had found that fear of buying a fake wine was the biggest barrier to entry for imported wines, with 44% of respondents saying it put them off buying.

‘There is a growing trend for drinking wine for pleasure rather than serving it at banquets or giving it as gifts,’ Maria Troein, China manager for Wine Intelligence told China Daily.
Read on …

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Chateau Hansen's vineyards near the Gobi desert.

Chateau Hansen’s vineyards near the Gobi desert.

Chinese winery Chateau Hansen, based on the edge of the Gobi Desert, is set to sell a new icon wine for €500 a bottle in its home market.

 

Hansen, based in Wuhai, Inner Mongolia, is poised to release the new wine, a single varietal Cabernet Sauvignon called Red Camel, this summer.

Up to 10,000 bottles of Red Camel will be produced, sourced from a single parcel of vines in organic vineyards in the neighbouring region of Ningxia.

The grapes are harvested in two waves: the first batch, making up about two-thirds of the blend, when the grapes reach about 12% alcohol; and the second very late, when the vines are bare and the grapes are beginning to shrivel.

 
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Yes, it’s true. Two of China’s wines have won silver in this year’s Decanter World Wine Awards, Jing Daily reports.

The wines are the Great Wall Terrior 2006 from Shandong and Domaine Helan Mountain Special Reserve Chardonnay 2011 from Ningxia.

A total of 20 wines from China were recognized this year by Decanter out of a total 49 entries.

In 2011, Helan Qing Xue’s Jia Bei Lan Cabernet Dry Red 2009 received the top prize from Decanter, drawing much skepticism and controversy.

While China does not have a great reputation for its wine (real or otherwise), there are domestic vineyards producing quality wines.

 

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Wealthy Chinese now buying so much more than just ...

Wealthy Chinese now buying so much more than just …

 

Christie’s is capitalising on the thirst for wealthy Chinese consumers to buy wineries by opening the world’s first estate agency for would-be vineyard buyers.

Vineyards by Christie’s International Real Estate, billed as the “first global advisory for buyers of vineyard estates”, is to open in Hong Kong.

Run by both wine experts and luxury property specialists, the agency will offer a consultancy service for clients looking to acquire vineyards around the world.

According to David Elswood, Christie’s international director of wine in Europe and Asia, the idea for the agency came after continued demand from clients at the auction house’s wine auctions in Hong Kong for advice on buying vineyard properties overseas.

“We are uniquely positioned to offer this highly specialised vineyard advisory acquisition service and we look forward to this exciting venture,” he said.

In addition to advice on which wineries are on sale around the world, Christie’s will also provide clients with custom travel arrangements and translation services.

“Wineries in sought after locations are often small and discrete, and without guidance, buyers never even know they are on the market.
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Chinese wine industry could endanger Panda's habitat.

Chinese wine industry could endanger Panda’s habitat.

The habitats of endangered giant pandas are being threatened by planned vineyard plantings in the Chinese provinces of Shaanxi and Sichuan.
According to the South China Morning Post, authorities in Shaanxi plan to plant 18,000 hectares of vineyards, and similar schemes are in the pipeline for Sichuan, putting the 1,600 wild giant pandas that inhabit the provinces at risk.

While the Chinese government has set up reserves for giant pandas, the animals don’t always remain inside them.

“Vineyards around a panda reserve can definitely affect the animals.

“Pandas move outside of reserves, so the forest outside is an important habitat. If forest is cleared to plant grapes, there may be direct loss of panda habitat,” climate change specialist Dr. Lee Hannah said in a study of the impacts of climate change on wine production and conservation.
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What do Chinese wine consumers really think?

 

Wine Intelligence China Team shares five key challenges they faced in their latest projects in China at a recent MRS event

Distilling 4 years of experience working in China into a 40 minute lecture was never going to be easy. Yet this was the challenge set us by the UK Market Research Society (MRS) a couple of weeks ago, when they invited us to address our fellow market research professionals in a session entitled “In Vino Veritas? The challenges of finding out what the Chinese really think about wine”.

After a healthy debate among the Wine Intelligence China market team, we settled on five key challenges that we have faced in recent projects. Here they are:

1. The real China is a complex cultural mosaic
The extent to which Chinese people are different from each other is tough to grasp from an occidental perspective – at least at first. The complexity of the country in terms of its cuisines, languages, climates, economic layers, culture, and lifestyle becomes apparent with time spent in the country, and away from the Tier 1 cities. Hangzhou is not like Harbin, which is very different from Chengdu. So which is the real China? It’s a bit like flying from Bremen to Barcelona, and having to decide, between those two cities, which represents the real Europe – a decision both impossible and pointless.

 
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5021wine4

 

Asian drinkers keep Bordeaux out of the red.

 

Bordeaux wine sales continue to rise, stimulated by a thirsty export market that is in contrast to falling French consumption of the region’s wines.

Bordeaux recorded a 2 percent increase in volume sales and a 10 percent growth in value in the year ending July 2012, according to figures released by the regional trade association, the CIVB, on Monday.

The region has defied the economic downturn, shipping 5.5m hectoliters of wine worth 4.3 billion euros ($5.6bn) in the last year.

While “the current and future economic situation remains difficult, the figures for 2012 can be considered satisfactory,” said Georges Haushalter, president of the CIVB.

The upward curve is largely thanks to massive sales growth in the Far East. “One bottle in four is exported to China and Hong Kong,” said Haushalter. “It is an extraordinary development. We have multiplied export volumes [to this market] 100 times in the space of 10 years,”

The Asian market has also evolved during this period, explained… read on

 

Also read:

Results from the latest auction suggest Asian collectors could soon be heading south of Burgundy.

 

Cheers to Burgundy, hello to the Rhone.

Cheers to Burgundy, hello to the Rhone.

 

There are signs that the fine wines of the Rhône Valley are beginning to garner interest from Asian buyers, following the buoyant sale results of Paul Jaboulet Aîné’s wines at Sotheby’s over the weekend.

The December 8 auction in Hong Kong suggests fine-wine collectors in Asia are prepared to look beyond Bordeaux and Burgundy. All of the lots, which came direct from the producer’s cellar, were sold, with the 1961 Hermitage La Chapelle fetching 171,500 Hong Kong dollars ($21,987) per bottle – 165 percent higher than the auction house’s estimate.

The sale of the Jaboulet Aîné wines, ranging from 1949 to 2009,… read on

Champagne house wants to focus on three Bordeaux properties, buyer King Power wants to expand

The King of Asian Duty Free, King Power.

The King of Asian Duty Free, King Power.

King Power, a Pan-Asian duty-free powerhouse with interests in the Chinese alcoholic drinks market, has acquired Bordeaux’s Château Bernadotte from Champagne Louis Roederer for an undisclosed sum. La Bernadotte has 100 acres of vineyards in Haut-Medoc, producing about 17,000 cases a year. It joined the Roederer stable when the Champagne house purchased second-growth Château Pichon Longueville Lalande in 2006.

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The History of Chinese Wine.

The History of Chinese Wine.

 

I’ve been reading quite a bit about China recently and not only because they’re the second largest economy in the world (and growing very fast) or because some of the unscrupulous amongst them make really large volumes of really bad quality stuff with which they flood the markets of, especially but not only, developing countries. Thing is, not everybody is unscrupulous and not all Chinese are cruel triad-like taskmasters! I would be devastated if my Chinese deli disappeared and it makes my blood boil when I meet people who seem to think that Chinese
food consists only of sweet-n-sour pork, sticky rice or stir-fried noodles. Good Lord, the Chinese were hosting banquets before we even thought of sharing meals and to belittle an entire culture just because a fanatic and his friends stole just over 50 years of their lives is insanity. The reason most of us haven’t tasted or seen upmarket Chinese products is precisely because the Chinese nation is so huge! They simply don’t make enough to export. Yet. They also produce wine (and are currently the fourth largest producer in the world) and even though, at this stage, it doesn’t really compare to the wines of the west (in fact, the tasting I had was pretty darn awful), I’m sure that they will, given time, get there.  In fact, experts seem to think that China can become the next Chile within the next decade! Before I go on (and to prove my point about Chinese food), here’s a recipe for some really good kebabs from the province of Xinjiang where the Uighur people have lived for centuries; the food, like their language has a Turkic touch.
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