Posts Tagged ‘Consumption’

German beer consumption hit a 20 year low. But why?

German beer consumption hit a 20 year low. But why?

Following the news that beer consumption in the UK was down by 50 million pints in the first quarter of this year, comes the news that sales in Germany have slumped as well.

According to figures released by Germany’s Federal Statistical Office, in March domestic sales of beer fell by 10.9% year-on-year; exports were also down, falling by 13.3% over the same period.

Over the first quarter of this year German beer sales dropped to 19.9 million hectolitres, the lowest amount for at least 20 years. Volume dropped 4.3% to the lowest level since 1993, when the data were adjusted to exclude alcohol-free beer.

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Study reveals less wine being drunk by the French.

Study reveals less wine being drunk by the French.

A surprising 38 per cent of the French don’t drink wine at all, up from 19.2 per cent in 1980.

The French are drinking less wine, very much less.
It is always a shock to the system when nations fail to live up to their stereotypes. Next thing you know, the French will be opposing long lunches, gay marriage, precision in all things and the inalienable right of all Paris waiters to be bloody rude to well-meaning tourists who blunder in saying “Bonjour” rather than “Bonjour monsieur.”
Yes, I can report that the French are putting the brakes on everything except precision because it’s too much fun tormenting those who don’t know precisely how things are done in France. How are they done? Just so. The damask tablecloth is ironed from beneath, the cheeses must not fight each other, do not smile at passersby like an idiot lest you be taken for an American.
There were demonstrations recently against French President François Hollande’s plan to legalize gay marriage. This one I could possibly explain away with the classic definition of marriage as “a friendship recognized by the police.” Perhaps the French were simply supporting the alleged sexual licentiousness of the gay population which will be tamed by marriage, although not by French marriage from what I hear.

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Wine is on the rise.

Wine is on the rise.

The Wine Market Council finds that wine drinking has expanded to more venues.
Amid a still-challenging economic environment, wine sales continued to grow in 2012, according to the Wine Market Council—an independent, nonprofit trade association—and The Nielsen Company, which presented their annual findings on U.S. consumer trends in wine. Key discoveries included:

Not just for fancy restaurants. Wine drinkers are finding more occasions suitable for consuming wine, including less traditional venues like ball games or concerts. That said, restaurant patronage has increased since the downturn in the 2008–2009 recession, and wine consumption at expensive restaurants has rebounded along with that. An increase in wine consumption at casual chain restaurants, including quick service restaurants, also was observed.

“The story isn’t just more wine drinkers,” said John Gillespie, President of the Wine Market Council, “but that they are drinking wine much more frequently, and that’s what’s driving growth.” Particularly among Millennials and Generation Xers, “wine is finding its way into places and times we thought were previously unavailable.”

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The average per annum wine consumption for a Canadian adult is now 15 litres.

 

Wine producers will be proposing a toast to Canadian consumers: a new study shows wine consumption in this country is growing three times faster than globally and Canada is projected to be the fifth fastest-growing wine market in the next five years.

Most of the wine consumed in Canada is imported but “Canada is now very strong on the production side and domestic wines are getting more popular,” said Vinexpo chairman Xavier de Eizaguirre in a telephone interview, speaking from Toronto.

“But the fact there is now a local industry, particularly here in Ontario, is helping the overall picture. Volume-wise it’s certainly a country where consumption is going up. Our forecast is it will continue to go up in the next five years.”

Growing market
De Eizaguirre said Canada’s per capita wine consumption is around 15 litres a year, compared to about 12 in the U.S.

“France, Italy, Spain, the traditional markets, consume somewhere around 50 litres per capita. England is about 25, Argentina is about 45, so there is a lot of potential” for Canada to increase its consumption, he said.

Between 2007 and 2011, Canadian wine consumption increased by 14.55 per cent. Consumption hit 43.21 million cases in 2011; one case represents 12 bottles.

Analysts said that between 2012 and 2016 Canadian wine consumption will go up 14.27 per cent, eventually reaching 50.7 million cases annually, which is three times greater than the global average.

Between 2012 and 2016, China, the United States, Russia and Germany will be ahead of Canada in wine consumption. In the previous five years, Canada was third behind China and the U.S.

“You’ve dropped back because the others have gone quite crazy,” de Eizaguirre said.
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Wine has spoken!

Wine has spoken!

 

The number of pints of beer and cider consumed in the UK will fall by 1.6 billion between now and 2018 the Office of Budget Responsibility has said.
Conversely, the number of 250ml glasses of wine will rise by 856m. While the number of cigarettes smoked will also fall by 9bn.

The numbers are part of the OBR’s forecast estimates regarding social habits, which will determine future tax levels.
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Rather have a glass of wine!

Rather have a glass of wine!

The risk of depression is significantly lower in women who drink moderate amounts of wine, a study has found.

 

More than 13,000 adults in Spain were studied over a ten-year period, with the outcome based on a doctor’s diagnosis or on the habitual use of anti-depressant drugs for four or more years.

Reported depression was much higher among women than men, but for those women drinking 5-15g of alcohol a day (approximately one glass), the risk of diagnosis of depression was significantly lower, when compared to… read on

 

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The big divide!

The big divide!

 

Quite a brouhaha they’re having over in France, where the government plans to tax beer, but not wine.

This, despite the fact that the French barely drink beer at all; France has Europe’s next to last lowest beer consumption rate. (Maybe that’s why the government is targeting foam heads. There’s not enough of them to organize a proper riot.) The extra funding the proposed tax will bring in is to go to the country’s social security system.

There may not be many beer drinkers in France, but such as they are, they’re an ornery lot, annoyed they’re being asked to dig deeper while snootier wine drinkers aren’t. “I am shocked that beer is the only target,” said a café owner, quoted in the New York Times, which added, “Complaints about the tax increase are coming not just from customers, but from brewers, the food industry generally and politicians, who know that some voters, at least, like French ales.”

The controversy also has stirred up an old dualism: … read on

THE story of Australia’s wine consumption over the past five years has been dominated by the Kiwi-led invasion of imports, and private label wines that have thrived amid the wine glut. But all this is about to change.
Australian brand wines will take the lion’s share of sales growth over the next three years, primarily driven by consumers who continue to upgrade their wine consumption from the cask-end of the market to premium bottled wine.
According to market researcher Nielsen, we may be consuming less wine overall, but we are willing to pay more for what we do drink.
”It’s a universal story, quite frankly, in alcohol, which is we’re simply buying… read on