Posts Tagged ‘County’

The popular, Guy Fieri.

The popular, Guy Fieri.

 

Guy Fieri, a celebrity chef known for his rowdy personality, spiky hair and love of roadside diners, is adding an unexpected venture to his mix: winemaking.

The star of the Food Network series “Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives” has bought a five-acre vineyard of pinot noir grapes in the Russian River Valley appellation and submitted an application to open a wine tasting room on Willowside Road.

“Ever since I moved to Sonoma County and saw all this incredible environment of wine, from the agricultural side of it to the business side of it, to the community involvement side of it … I’ve just been in awe,” Fieri said Friday. “So my wife and I were talking about it, and saying, ‘Can we do that some day?’”

Fieri bought the property last year. In his first vintage, 2012, he sold his grapes to Jackson Family Wines for its La Crema brand and to Williams Selyem winery in Healdsburg, which both have had long-term contracts to purchase grapes from the vineyard.

He has initiated organic farming methods on the vineyard and is… read on

If the Napa Valley can’t reduce traffic to arrest global warming, does any other wine region have a chance?

 

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If you build it, they will come – in droves. But Napa Valley’s booming wine industry has created a buildup of traffic that is giving county planners a headache. Napa Valley has long been a leader in environmental responsibility, passing a landmark Agricultural Preserve law in 1968 that severely restricts development outside of cities, and its environmental behavior as a whole is right up to the mark. However, Napa County is finding that actually passing a Climate Action Plan isn’t easy. Last year, the county’s planning staff came up with a proposal that would have restricted wineries from expanding production facilities and tasting rooms without paying large penalties. Everyone seemed on board with the scheme until December, when the powerful Napa Valley Vintners organization led a push that sent the plan back to the drawing board. The vintners didn’t like some of the costs they would have had to pay, including carbon mitigation fees 10 times higher than those on the open market. But their biggest objection was the fact that the plan sought to take most of the carbon reduction from wine production, when the biggest culprit – by a large margin – is traffic.

 

Read on …