Posts Tagged ‘digital’

Digital Darwinism I define as this era when society and technology are evolving faster than the ability for many businesses to adapt.

Digital Darwinism I define as this era when society and technology are evolving faster than the ability for many businesses to adapt.

 

Across many areas social media has become an increasingly important avenue for promotion and the alcohol industry is no different.
Last year a leading expert told the drinks business that social media is now so important to the wine world that wineries who put off using it will experience “digital Darwinism”.

Social media gives brands a fresh way to communicate with their consumers; Twitter and Facebook offer a scale of brand-consumer interaction that has previously not existed.

While some brands are clearly better than others at using social media a recent study by the L2 think tank showed that beer brands in particular are lagging behind other industries. The think tank assessed the digital competency of beer brands in the US and found that just two, Heineken and Budweiser, earned a “Genius” ranking.

L2′s report said: “On the social media front, Heineken had very little competition, nabbing the top spot for most Facebook fans, most Facebook engagement, most Twitter followers (aggregate global feeds), biggest YouTube community, and most individual YouTube channel views.

 

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Digital Facts you must know...

Digital Facts you must know…

 

01. Mobile internet usage is projected to overtake desktop internet usage by 2014

The facts and numbers around mobile usage is pretty staggering. Over 1 billion mobile devices are currently in use, and the number keeps on growing. We use and rely on our phones on a daily basis and if you don’t have a mobile friendly website you will get lost in the shuffle. By 2014 mobile internet usage should outpace desktops. This stat varies by source but 2014/15 is right around the corner. 2013 is the year to think about how your website caters to the mobile market.
02. Yes, you really do need a mobile friendly website

Not having a mobile friendly site will hurt the user experience as well as brand reputation. Google did a study on what users want from a mobile site and here are a few key points: 50% of people said that even if they like a business, they will use them less often if the website isn’t mobile friendly. And 48% said that if a site didn’t work well on their smartphones, it made them feel like the company didn’t care about their business.
03. Responsive design is the solution to the mobile dilemma

If you are not mobile friendly the solution resides within a technique called responsive design. Essentially this happens in the coding of the site and allows you to create one website that works across all devices. Knowing that 2014 is around the bend, and if you are planning to redesign your website, I strongly encourage implementing a responsive site. With the one site for all devices mindset this eliminates the need for specific mobile domains. With one site for all devices, content is managed in one spot and you don’t have to worry about a seperate domain for mobile search rankings.
04. Search engine websites are the most visited websites on a smartphone

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Digital snapshots may make cute holiday memories for all to share, but now a similar technology may soon help create superb Syrahs or marvelous Merlots. Researchers have created a new way to peer inside a grape to identify its composition and variety through computer imaging. This could cut back on laborious chemical analysis for winemakers.

Francisco José Rodríguez Pulido, a researcher at the Univ. of Seville, says that the new system could work for both small growers as well as large companies.

“The cultivation of the vine and the production of quality red wines are facing serious problems due to high temperatures and climate change,” says Pulido, adding that it makes it difficult for growers to know when to pick. “Usually, there is a gap between the pulp and the seed maturation, particularly in red grapes,” which means that the different parts of each grape mature at different speeds, making it tough to pick at the right moment to maximize phenols – the coveted flavor notes that contribute to taste, color and mouthfeel.

Pulido says that the process takes just a few minutes. A camera snaps a high-resolution picture of the seeds. Then, customized software identifies the seeds in the image and measures their color according to a standardized index of colors

The close relationship between appearance and chemical composition makes it possible to estimate how mature the seeds are – which is a good indication of when to pick the grapes. The process was tested and proven in Spanish grapes, but Pulido says that it should work in any type of red or white wine.

Pulido and his colleagues published their research on the new method in the journal Analytica Chimica Acta.

Gregory Balint, a professor at the Oregon Wine Research Institute, says that determining grape maturity is a toilsome process, and a digital tool could help – but he is not convinced that color is the best way to determine ripeness. “I couldn’t see any correlation between basic data like soluble solids, acidity and pH and these colorimetric parameters,” he says.

“Many winemakers are still using these basic parameters to schedule the best time for harvesting. Moreover, many winemakers and growers are using the sensory evaluation of the berries, including seeds, to assess the maturity levels,” says Balint. He adds that winemakers could use something like this method in conjunction with other tools.
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