Posts Tagged ‘Door’

Learn how to promote your wine events better.

Learn how to promote your wine events better.

 

While using social media or any kind of mail, e or snail, it can be difficult to stay on the correct side of the line between “how very interesting” and “report spam.” When done right, postcards, email and Facebook can be great ways to get the word out and keep your audience clued in about your winery’s upcoming events.

In the case of all 3, make sure that the names in your database were volunteered and not harvested from another online source by you or a broker. Trust in mailing lists has been declining for a while now thanks to their abuse. However, if your recipients asked to receive updates then your response rates will directly reflect that vote of confidence.

Postcard
In this digital age of lol cats, instant message immediacy, sparkly web banners and pop up ads, there is not a better target for a postcard than that of the cultured wine drinker. The luxury of wine denotes a subscription to a slower, higher quality lifestyle. A good postcard does the same.

Powerful headline
A good postcard makes use of the headline. Grab the viewer’s attention and get them curious with a statement like “5 Courses – 65 Wines.” Have fun with it, but know your audience too. “The Redefine Wine and Dine Event” speaks to a very different audience than “Drink Up Bitches” as a headline.

It Should Look and Feel as Good as the Wine
You have a special opportunity with any print media to deliver actual quality rather than trying to convey it. Like an unfiltered Chardonnay, the substrate can be rich and full-bodied with a real tactile experience. Or, capture an oily texture with a coated stock that will really showcase the colors with refinement and polish. The feel of the winery can really be promoted here as the entire, full bleed side of the postcard is available to be designed.

Information
Of course, don’t forget to give them the information. Provide the date of the event, the time, location and description of why they really shouldn’t be missing out. Give them a link to find more information online but make sure the URL is short and sweet. They can’t click on it so it’s never been more important to avoid that convoluted jumble of nonsensical letters, numbers and special characters. (Really, though, it’s always a good idea.)

Be sure to include:

•date
•time
•description
•where they can find more information
Read on …

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When I worked at Robert Mondavi Winery, I loved all aspects of being there, with one exception. I had a really hard time with the repetition of Wine 101 three to four times a day. I reached the point of feeling like I was channeling Lily Tomlin, doing her Broadway hit of “Searching for Sings of Intelligent Life,” wine country style. I had one lady say to me, “Dear, we can tell that you just love your job.” I smiled and said, “I just love wine country,” keeping it honest. What she didn’t know was that just the day before my husband said to me, after I told him I didn’t know how much longer I could take it, “Your job is to now be a good actress.”

 

I took a job at Mondavi as a wine educator, so I could get my foot in their PR department’s door. The first interview told me all I need to know, though. After the interview, I was told that I was over qualified… The job being offered was equivalent to what they called “a glorified clipping service.” I was told that I’d “become bored so quickly that we’ll lose you.” Instead of letting me get my foot into that door, they hired an MBA fresh out of college. I planned my escape, and told them what I was doing. Within a very short amount of time, a director of public relations job opened up at Ironstone Vineyards, and off I went to work in the Sierras. Most of it was done through telecommuting and I was back to traveling 60,000 miles a year around the US.

Now, back to this one particular day that offered me great joy and a diversion from what had become so challenging for me to say, “Welcome to Robert Mondavi Winery. My name is Jo, and I’m going to be your wine educator for the next hour.”

I need to preface this, also, with the fact that I love children. So much, in fact, that I spent years as the director of Androscoggin Day Camp for Girl Scouts in Maine. I even created a “Boy” unit in my camp, because the volunteers also had sons. I felt that they shouldn’t have to be left behind, and they created a nice little unit within the camp. I simply adore children. And, I was also a Girl Scout leader for about 10 years, and a Camp Fire leader for another few years.

So, this day delivered a tour with four overly rambunctious boys, whom I quickly called Rumble, Tumble, Fumble, and Bumble in my head.

They were decidedly not happy about being in wine country with their parents; and frankly, if I were a 10-year old boy, I’d be jumping all over my buddies, too, instead of looking at an expertly positioned trellising system with stressed vines.

I began, not with my usual shpeel, but instead with….

Read on …