Posts Tagged ‘Drunk’

 

 

A student at Arizona State University, who passed out after a drinking competition, was left in a wheelchair in a hospital lobby with a Post-it note telling doctors that he had been drinking.
Police are now considering whether to charge the 19-year-old student, who has not been named, with underage drinking.

Police spokesman Sgt Michael Pooley said that the student was found in the emergency room lobby of St Luke’s Hospital in Tempe, Arizona. The note had been stuck to the student saying that he had been drinking and he needed help.

 

Read on …

apocalypse-1

It is often said that one of the hardest things for an actor to portray convincingly is that of being drunk.

This can of course be countered by actually being drunk at the time, advice some of the actors on this list took very much to heart.

Drink has played a role in more or less every film ever made, except most children’s films. Think about it. How many films have scenes in bars or dinner parties or have a character constantly sipping from a hip flask or celebrating or drinking to forget?

Some films, as the drinks business has previously highlighted, are dedicated to drink entirely.

But it is a more select group of films which use alcohol as a driver of the plot, tackling issues such as suicide, loneliness and depression.

Tragic, comic, terrifying, a good drunk performance can make a film, permanently fixing it in one’s subconscious.

There are so many scenes to choose from this list, as with all lists, is very far from definitive but it does, hopefully, focus on some of the most striking and funny cinematic boozing.

It is also worth giving an honourable mention to WC Fields (pictured) who for roughly his entire career, played the perma-tipsy old rogue/grouch who uttered such memorable lines as: “I was in love with a beautiful blonde once, dear. She drove me to drink. That’s the one thing I am indebted to her for.”

And: “Once, on a trek through Afghanistan, we lost our corkscrew…and were forced to live on food and water for several days!”

Read on …

You have to tweet , when you have to tweet!

 

 

When do people use social media like Facebook or Twitterr? Nearly half (48.6 percent) do it while in the “reading room,” according to a recent online survey by CreditDonkey.com, a credit card comparison website.

 

And almost as many — 47.6 percent — admitted to doing it while drunk.
According to the survey, those who use social media when nature calls are more likely to be checking Facebook than tweeting.
They are also less likely to do their online shopping while gazing at the screen in the toilet, the survey found.
Males are more likely to engage in both toilet tweeting and drunk posting, says CreditDonkey, perhaps because of the ubiquitous smartphone.
Other survey highlights include:
• 51.4 percent of male respondents have used social media while under the influence of alcohol versus 41.4 percent of female respondents.
• 54.0 percent of male respondents have used social media while on the toilet versus 40.4 percent of female respondents.
• 43.5 percent of all respondents use their smartphone mostly for social networking.

Read on …

The now well-scientifically-established French Paradox — which has driven a wine/health craze since the pivotal 60 Minutes Episode on Nov. 17, 1991 — is all about moderate consumption.

Red wine sales increased 44% after the broadcast … dropped off a bit, then soared again a year later when the program was re-broadcast. As a whole, per-capita consumption in the U.S was in decline until then. And has been on the upswing ever since.

However, wine industry neglect and government guessing, has made the defining of “moderate” an unclear and, perhaps, unhealthy situation.

What’s Moderate? What’s A Drink?

And are you a drunk and don’t know it?

WHAT IS MODERATE DRINKING?

The biggest problem with defining this level concerns how researchers and government agencies gather data.

In general, the vast majority of the hundreds of peer-reviewed scientific studies define “moderate” as 1 drink a day for women and no more than two. For men, that range is 1 to 2 drinks a day but no more than 3 or 4. Weekly consumption for “moderate” is 7 for women and no more than 14 for men.

This site: from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) offers the current definition of Moderate & Binge Drinking. While NIAAA receives almost half a billion dollars per year in tax funds, as far as can be determined, they have never conducted studies on the health benefits of moderate consumption.

That may seem unfair, but they are in keeping with other government-sponsored alcohol organizations including those at the United Nations.

DATA COLLECTION ISSUES PLAGUE “STANDARDIZATION”

The definitions of “moderate” and “binge” are somewhat based on the extensive research showing that moderate drinkers of alcohol live longer and more illness-free lives than either heavy drinkers or abstainers (with corrections for abstainers who do not drink because of illness or other health issues).

However, those definitions are based on self-reported consumption data from alcohol consumers who may underestimate the number of drinks they consume. In addition, most drinkers do not have a precise idea of exactly what constitutes “a drink.”

In the absence of hard data in large population studies in hundreds of scientific papers, government agencies have basically made a wild guess and decided that the “standard” is one that contains a very small amount of alcohol — 14 grams.

This is a timeworn bureaucratic technique: when the facts aren’t available, make one up.

And thus, the “standard” drink was invented based on a guess with no solid facts at all.

But like so many government pronouncements — especially when UNchallenged by private parties — this bureaucratic invention of convenience has achieved the level of dogma.

Read on …