Posts Tagged ‘Enjoy’

Red wine is good for you!

A natural ingredient found in red wine, resveratrol, can help fight off diseases associated with age, a new study shows.
Resveratrol, found in the skin of grapes, has long been touted for its anti-ageing properties.
Researchers are studying this natural compound to help them design better anti-aging drugs.
They think it works by increasing the activity of sirtuins, a family of proteins found throughout the body, which are believed to combat diseases related to getting older, like type 2 diabetes, cancer or Alzheimer’s. Specifically, resveratrol increases the activity of SIRT1, which acts to make our mitochondria — the cell part that turns food into energy in our cells — more efficient, the study says.
The direct link between resveratrol and the SIRT1 protein has been made before, both by the lead author of this latest paper, Harvard genetics professor David Sinclair, and others.
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Women who drink red wine enjoy better sex lives, an Italian university study has suggested

Women who drink red wine enjoy better sex lives, an Italian university study has suggested

Women who drink red wine enjoy better sex lives, a study from the University of Florence in Italy has suggested.

A study among Tuscan women discovered that one or two glasses a day could lead to a more fulfilling life in the bedroom.

Experts from the university questioned 800 women between 18 and 50 Santa Maria Annunziata Hospital about their sexual satisfaction.

Using the Female Sexual Function Index – which is used by doctors to assess women and sexual health – it emerged that drinkers scored higher than teetotallers.
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new-rules-of-wine-628

(Image courtesy of Michael Crichton)

 
You chill your whites but not your reds, pair your fancy bottles with fancy food, and skip right past the pink champagne. Guess what: You’re doing wine all wrong.

 

We talked to the best sommeliers, vintners, and career winos around to rewrite the book on this fermented-grape-juice thing. And we came up with enough great wine to keep your glass half full till 2012 and beyond

 

  • DON’T WORRY

If you didn’t pick up those subtle hints of “kaffir lime,” “black currant confiture,” and “the sweet stemminess of burning vine clippings”* when you stuck your nose into the glass. Take a look at two different tasting notes for the same bottle of wine—same vineyard, same vintage, two different critics. They almost never taste or smell the same stuff. Which is to say—your guess is as good as theirs. So drink. Decide what you like. And if you detect a hint of quince paste in your Sauvignon Blanc, keep it to yourself.—Stan Parish

* Real Wine Spectator tasting notes!

 

  • YES, WE’VE HEARD ALL ABOUT TERRIOR and some of us are a little sick of it

Sean Thackrey, one of the best winemakers in America (seriously, try his wine), explains why you should get your head out of the soil

The theory of terroir is the agricultural version of the theory of aristocracy: You are as you were born. You are the Duke of Norfolk or you are not the Duke of Norfolk, and that’s that. You buy Château Margaux because it’s Château Margaux, and it’s Château Margaux because the grapes were grown on a particular piece of land. So much money is riding on this idea that it’s imperative, from a financial point of view, to maintain this extremely profitable mystification of real estate. There’s no traditional word for ‘winemaker’ in French, Spanish, or Italian, because over there they’d like you to think that we humans are just humble servants of the soil’s desire to express itself. Of course grapes grown in different places taste different; that’s a banality no one disputes. But so much has to happen to those grapes before they end up in your glass, and someone—the winemaker—has to call those shots. Even if you supplied ten different restaurants with identical produce, you would expect ten totally different results. Do you really think the work of a winemaker is less complex than the work of a chef? Winemaking is like cooking: The chef bats last, for better or worse. And if we’re to take the blame for bad results that we deserve, we should get credit for good ones, too.”
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