Posts Tagged ‘Expensive’

Drinking for pleasure...

Drinking for pleasure…

 
As the Chinese economy slows, new figures confirm that Chinese consumers are seeking out less expensive wine brands.

 
Analysts Wine Intelligence found that in the first quarter of this year, 60% of consumers between the ages of 18 and 50 spent less than CNY200 (€25) on imported wine.

€25 is generally recognised as entry-level wine in China. An earlier survey in January this year had found that fear of buying a fake wine was the biggest barrier to entry for imported wines, with 44% of respondents saying it put them off buying.

‘There is a growing trend for drinking wine for pleasure rather than serving it at banquets or giving it as gifts,’ Maria Troein, China manager for Wine Intelligence told China Daily.
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An Sotheby's employee holds a rare Jeroboam of Château Mouton Rothschild from 1953 on Jan. 17, 2012 in LondonPhoto by Oli Scarff/Getty Images

An Sotheby’s employee holds a rare Jeroboam of Château Mouton Rothschild from 1953 on Jan. 17, 2012 in London
Photo by Oli Scarff/Getty Images

 

Some are excellent, others undrinkable.

Testimony began this week in billionaire William Koch’s lawsuit against Eric Greenberg, who Koch claims sold him some very expensive counterfeit wine. (Mike Steinberger wrote a detailed investigation of the case for Slate in 2010.) Some of the bottles went for nearly $30,000, which has Koch so miffed that he refuses to settle the case. If you spend $30,000 on a bottle of wine, can you expect it to be better than a $20,000 bottle or a $10,000 bottle?
Not really. Full disclosure: The Explainer has never tasted, and has no discernible prospects of ever tasting, a $10,000 bottle of wine. The wine experts he consulted, however, emphasized that the difference between wines in this price range is not quality, but rather prestige, rarity, and age. Upon opening, some four- or five-figure bottles of wine “justify” their price—at least to experienced wine critics and people who can conceive of paying $30,000 for 1.5 liters of fermented grape juice. (A 1947 Cheval Blanc, for example, blew away Slate’s wine critic.) Other bottles have slid far beyond their peak, losing their volatile fruit flavors to age and, frequently, improper storage. Occasionally, giddy wine lovers uncork an ultra-expensive wine only to find that it has turned to vinegar. As wine enthusiasts say, there are no great wines, only great bottles. However, just like a high-roller going all in at the poker table, some wealthy wine lovers perceive value in unpredictability.

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Fine Wine are still a good investment!

Fine Wine are still a good investment!

 

Fine wine prices in 2013 could rise 14% above their 2012 year end level, a new forecast predicts.

The Wine Investment Fund, an unregulated collective investment scheme, says this is the best time to enter the wine market since 2009.

The risk profile of the market compares much more favourably to recent years, the author of the report, TWIF investment manager Chris Smith says.

‘Our realistic worst-case scenario [is] a fall of only 5%, whereas an increase of 25% by the [wine trading platform] Liv-ex 100 Index is well within the bounds of possibility.’

This will be welcome news to wine investors who saw the value of their liquid assets fall by… read on

wine-flight

Can you spot the difference?

 

Can you really taste the difference between a $15 wine and a $150 wine? Wine enjoyment is such an objective experience and taste is not exactly an exact science.  During a recent trip to Paso Robles I came face-to-face with my own shortcomings and the ugly truth of wine: much of what we taste is in our heads and not in the wine. I was traveling with a lovely group of wine journalists—each of us boasting some expertise in wine, some with fancy degrees behind our names and official titles. During a tasting at Still Waters Vineyards the proprietor poured two whites (the bottles were covered in brown bags) and asked us to try and discern the varietals. We all eagerly set to the task, using our infinite powers of wine-soaked observation to peg the wines being poured.

Everyone loves a challenge. We swirled, we sniffed, we wrinkled our brows in contemplation.  Some of us nodding with assurance. I took notes, finding the first white to be more floral and elegant than the second. Drawing on my years and years (there have been too many) of tasting, studying and observation, I swiftly concluded that the first wine was an unoaked Chardonnay and the second was a Sauvignon Blanc, easy peasy. Much to my mortification I was dead wrong, as was everyone else in the room. The proprietor chuckled and informed his room of bright-eyed ambitious wine journalists that the wines were actually the same wine; one was just warmer than the other. He wasn’t intentionally shaming us (not one person got it right); he was pointedly demonstrating the power of just one element in the wine tasting experience: temperature.
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