Posts Tagged ‘Growing’

Truffles coming to a vineyard near you!

Truffles coming to a vineyard near you!

 

The truffle trend is coming to a vineyard near you.
Thanks to new technology—which allows young oak and chestnut tree roots to be inoculated with black truffle spores—several U.S. wine producers are planting the tasty tuber melanosporum alongside their Pinot and Cab.

Growing secondary crops on a vineyard promotes biodiversity and is key to the long-term health of the land, says Robert Sinskey, of Sinskey Vineyards, which is home to Napa Valley’s first truffle orchard. And given the fact truffles are in such high demand—selling for as much as $1,200 a pound—planting an orchard made perfect sense.

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Fine wine coming soon!

 

 

The Mediterranean may one day no longer be suitable for wine production

Vino connoisseurs, take note: Your next fine wine might come from Yellowstone or Canada. Climate change is quickly making it harder for some of the most famous wine-making regions in the Mediterranean to produce grapes, according to a new study published Monday.
Nearly three quarters of the world’s wine-producing regions might become unsuitable for grape production by 2050, according to the study, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

“Climate change has the potential to drive changes in viticulture that will impact Mediterranean ecosystems and to threaten native habitats in areas of expanding suitability,” the study suggests.

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What do you think, shall we buy?

What do you think, shall we buy?

 

As prices stabilise and Robert Parker prepares to re-evaluate 2010, Jon Barr, director of EF Wines, has declared “Bordeaux appears to be back”.
Speaking to the drinks business, Barr said that Lafite sales were strong again in Hong Kong, although he added that, “this may just be for the Chinese new year.”

Nonetheless, he continued: “It’s stabilised and people are getting interested again. Prices haven’t gone down, Liv-ex is showing some rises, I think it will be a good year”.

His comments come after a year when Bordeaux was subject to severe price drops as the market took a dip and as buyers branched out into other areas, notably Burgundy, Champagne and the Super Tuscans.
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usa-wine

 

Bragging rights aside, the country’s metropolitan areas differ greatly in their consumption of wines. Often, we see consumption expressed as gallons per capita. That measure doesn’t tell the whole story, though.

The “gallons” in gallons per capita are usually “all wines”, which includes sparkling wines, dessert wines and specially-flavored natural wines in addition to the table wines we think about. Table wines are still (no spritz) wines of no more than 14% alcohol. What’s that? You say you’ve been enjoying red table wines with more than 14% alcohol? Where are they classified? Well, as far as the federal government is concerned, those are dessert wines and are taxed at a higher rate than table wines. For wine marketers, however, those high alcohol wines are usually thought of as being table wines because they are displayed on the shelf alongside all of the other table wines and are sold the same as table wines.
The ratios differ from city-to-city, but the typical relationship is: table wine accounts for 87-88% of all wines. In the northeast and Midwest states, Champagne is still part of many cultural traditions, so the table wines share would be lower than elsewhere.

The bar chart (Figure 1) shows the top 20 metropolitan areas of America in estimated volume of table winesconsumed during 2011. Los Angeles-Long Beach-Riverside and New York-northern New Jersey-Long Island are in a class by themselves.
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s133_wmg

 

Planting Rights “Not My Priority” Says Commissioner

Europe’s agriculture chief steps back from the thorny issue of vineyard planting.

The European Commissioner for Agriculture, Dacian Ciolos, has announced he no longer wants to deal with the controversial question of planting rights in Europe. Instead, he is handing over responsibility for the issue to member states and the European Parliament.

In a report submitted to the commission last Friday, a high-level group of experts concluded that maintaining a system of planting rights was an “absolute necessity” for the European Union. The conclusion was a slap in the face for the commission, which had recommended the complete liberalization of vine growing in the 2008 European Wine Reform.

The experts received further support on the issue of maintaining planting rights on Wednesday. At a meeting of European ministers of agriculture, “the majority of states” backed their stand, an insider revealed.
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The History of Chinese Wine.

The History of Chinese Wine.

 

I’ve been reading quite a bit about China recently and not only because they’re the second largest economy in the world (and growing very fast) or because some of the unscrupulous amongst them make really large volumes of really bad quality stuff with which they flood the markets of, especially but not only, developing countries. Thing is, not everybody is unscrupulous and not all Chinese are cruel triad-like taskmasters! I would be devastated if my Chinese deli disappeared and it makes my blood boil when I meet people who seem to think that Chinese
food consists only of sweet-n-sour pork, sticky rice or stir-fried noodles. Good Lord, the Chinese were hosting banquets before we even thought of sharing meals and to belittle an entire culture just because a fanatic and his friends stole just over 50 years of their lives is insanity. The reason most of us haven’t tasted or seen upmarket Chinese products is precisely because the Chinese nation is so huge! They simply don’t make enough to export. Yet. They also produce wine (and are currently the fourth largest producer in the world) and even though, at this stage, it doesn’t really compare to the wines of the west (in fact, the tasting I had was pretty darn awful), I’m sure that they will, given time, get there.  In fact, experts seem to think that China can become the next Chile within the next decade! Before I go on (and to prove my point about Chinese food), here’s a recipe for some really good kebabs from the province of Xinjiang where the Uighur people have lived for centuries; the food, like their language has a Turkic touch.
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