Posts Tagged ‘Into’

 © Roy Morsch/CORBIS

© Roy Morsch/CORBIS

She is eyeing up the wine shelf. But how do you convert this “browser” into a “buyer”?

Studies from the Yale School of Management 1 have shown that it’s all about shifting a consumer’s frame of mind, from what psychologists call “deliberative” mode – where you’re busy weighing up practical factors like value for money, into a more “action-focused” purchasing gear.

Switching “browsers” into a buying mentality can be kick-started by offering products that need very little consideration such as a highly practical and low cost product e.g. an umbrella if it’s raining. Once one purchase decision has been made, shopping momentum builds up. A study has shown that once consumers have decided to buy a first item, they buy more items overall.

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Kate Hudson, not just an actress...

Kate Hudson, not just an actress…

 

Actress Kate Hudson and her rock star fiancé Matt Bellamy of Muse have become the latest in a steady stream of celebrities to enter the wine business.

According to Life & Style magazine, the couple were so pleased with their 2010 HudsonBellamy rosé that they now plan to start selling it into bars and restaurants.

The pair are reported to have offered friends and family the chance to buy cases before it goes on sale to the public, describing the wine as “crisp, bright and perfect for upcoming summer.”

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Château Smith Haut Lafitte in Bordeaux is to turn its carbon emissions into toothpaste.

Speaking to the drinks business at an en primuer tasting of the estate’s wines last week, co-owner Daniel Cathiard revealed details of the unusual plan.

“Our aim is to be as green as possible, so we’re going to capture the carbon emitted during the fermentation process and turn it into bicarbonate of soda to be used in toothpaste,” he said.

“We don’t want to waste anything here, so why not make the most of our carbon? We produce a lot of C02 at the winery and we want to be like a forest and capture it,” he added.

Cathiard told db that he would turn the carbon from a gas into sodium bicarbonate and sell it on to pharmaceutical companies for use in toothpaste.

He plans to make his first batch of bicarbonate of soda this year.

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Bulk wine imports more than doubled in the United States this year because of competitive pricing and changing consumer attitudes, according to a new survey from Silicon Valley Bank.
Silicon Valley Bank’s annual State of the Wine Industry survey – published yesterday – noted that bulk wine imports to the US ‘soared’ in 2012 as compared to the previous year, ‘from 13.7m cases, to 31.5m cases, and totalling over 40m cases in the past 12 months.’

According to the survey, the increase is due to higher domestic demand, better access to foreign bulk and favourable exchange rates.

In spite of a high-quality and high-volume California harvest in 2012, survey authors predict a continued increase in bulk imports this year, especially if the dollar strengthens.

Chile, Argentina and Australia were responsible for 75% of all bulk imports to the US in 2012.

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Digital snapshots may make cute holiday memories for all to share, but now a similar technology may soon help create superb Syrahs or marvelous Merlots. Researchers have created a new way to peer inside a grape to identify its composition and variety through computer imaging. This could cut back on laborious chemical analysis for winemakers.

Francisco José Rodríguez Pulido, a researcher at the Univ. of Seville, says that the new system could work for both small growers as well as large companies.

“The cultivation of the vine and the production of quality red wines are facing serious problems due to high temperatures and climate change,” says Pulido, adding that it makes it difficult for growers to know when to pick. “Usually, there is a gap between the pulp and the seed maturation, particularly in red grapes,” which means that the different parts of each grape mature at different speeds, making it tough to pick at the right moment to maximize phenols – the coveted flavor notes that contribute to taste, color and mouthfeel.

Pulido says that the process takes just a few minutes. A camera snaps a high-resolution picture of the seeds. Then, customized software identifies the seeds in the image and measures their color according to a standardized index of colors

The close relationship between appearance and chemical composition makes it possible to estimate how mature the seeds are – which is a good indication of when to pick the grapes. The process was tested and proven in Spanish grapes, but Pulido says that it should work in any type of red or white wine.

Pulido and his colleagues published their research on the new method in the journal Analytica Chimica Acta.

Gregory Balint, a professor at the Oregon Wine Research Institute, says that determining grape maturity is a toilsome process, and a digital tool could help – but he is not convinced that color is the best way to determine ripeness. “I couldn’t see any correlation between basic data like soluble solids, acidity and pH and these colorimetric parameters,” he says.

“Many winemakers are still using these basic parameters to schedule the best time for harvesting. Moreover, many winemakers and growers are using the sensory evaluation of the berries, including seeds, to assess the maturity levels,” says Balint. He adds that winemakers could use something like this method in conjunction with other tools.
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crystal-ball

 

Some things you may not know about me:

My favorite color is SAE/ECE amber—one of the few technically approved colors for automotive signal lamps.  Also, I enjoy long, romantic strolls on the beach at sunset.  As well, there is nothing that makes me happier than being awoken by a snuggly, huggly puppy nuzzling my crotch.  Equally, I can predict the future.

I discovered this last talent as a teenager, having found a magical ‘book’ in our den that foretold precisely where I would be and what I would be doing at, say, 12:00 PM the following Sunday—and it proved to be absolutely accurate.  Of course, it was TV Guide and AMC was showing the entire remastered Godfather trilogy at noon, so this is probably not a really good example.

I have noticed, however, that several times each year—especially when I am under undue stress from collection agencies and Friend of the Court—when I sit down to write a wine column, it is almost as if I sink into a fugue state and some occult Ouija force takes control of my fingers and types for me.

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crystalball

The following column needs to be taken seriously.  It was channeled via ‘psychography’, wherein the author falls into a trance-like state and is then possessed by some disembodied external force which composes a written prognostication without the subject’s conscious awareness. 

The ‘nominal’ author, Christian Kassel, was given an extensive polygraph examination afterward, and the only question that drew an ‘inconclusive’ was when he was asked if the machine was actually plugged in.

* Note that before the autowriting began, Kassel had already typed the dateline as Dec. 31, 2012…  As you can see, it was modified to ‘2013’ by whatever otherworldy haruspex had seized control of his phalanges, his soul and his personal computer.

Dec. 31st, 2013:  The Wine Year In Review

I think we can all agree that the global vortex that spun the Planet of Plonk out of control and led to the downfall of the Obama administration can trace its origins to January 22, 2013—the day after the President’s second inauguration.
Malia, in a world where everyone is Aryan.
On that day, the First Family’s 14-year-old-daughter Malia was diagnosed with an extremely rare form of acne known as nodulocystic papuphilia, a skin disorder that impairs the body’s ability to coagulate pus.

So physically disgusting—and psychologically devastating—is this disease that teenagers are frequently placed in state-run sensory-deprivation chambers throughout the duration of puberty.
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