Posts Tagged ‘Know’

Digital Facts you must know...

Digital Facts you must know…

 

01. Mobile internet usage is projected to overtake desktop internet usage by 2014

The facts and numbers around mobile usage is pretty staggering. Over 1 billion mobile devices are currently in use, and the number keeps on growing. We use and rely on our phones on a daily basis and if you don’t have a mobile friendly website you will get lost in the shuffle. By 2014 mobile internet usage should outpace desktops. This stat varies by source but 2014/15 is right around the corner. 2013 is the year to think about how your website caters to the mobile market.
02. Yes, you really do need a mobile friendly website

Not having a mobile friendly site will hurt the user experience as well as brand reputation. Google did a study on what users want from a mobile site and here are a few key points: 50% of people said that even if they like a business, they will use them less often if the website isn’t mobile friendly. And 48% said that if a site didn’t work well on their smartphones, it made them feel like the company didn’t care about their business.
03. Responsive design is the solution to the mobile dilemma

If you are not mobile friendly the solution resides within a technique called responsive design. Essentially this happens in the coding of the site and allows you to create one website that works across all devices. Knowing that 2014 is around the bend, and if you are planning to redesign your website, I strongly encourage implementing a responsive site. With the one site for all devices mindset this eliminates the need for specific mobile domains. With one site for all devices, content is managed in one spot and you don’t have to worry about a seperate domain for mobile search rankings.
04. Search engine websites are the most visited websites on a smartphone

Read on …

The now well-scientifically-established French Paradox — which has driven a wine/health craze since the pivotal 60 Minutes Episode on Nov. 17, 1991 — is all about moderate consumption.

Red wine sales increased 44% after the broadcast … dropped off a bit, then soared again a year later when the program was re-broadcast. As a whole, per-capita consumption in the U.S was in decline until then. And has been on the upswing ever since.

However, wine industry neglect and government guessing, has made the defining of “moderate” an unclear and, perhaps, unhealthy situation.

What’s Moderate? What’s A Drink?

And are you a drunk and don’t know it?

WHAT IS MODERATE DRINKING?

The biggest problem with defining this level concerns how researchers and government agencies gather data.

In general, the vast majority of the hundreds of peer-reviewed scientific studies define “moderate” as 1 drink a day for women and no more than two. For men, that range is 1 to 2 drinks a day but no more than 3 or 4. Weekly consumption for “moderate” is 7 for women and no more than 14 for men.

This site: from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) offers the current definition of Moderate & Binge Drinking. While NIAAA receives almost half a billion dollars per year in tax funds, as far as can be determined, they have never conducted studies on the health benefits of moderate consumption.

That may seem unfair, but they are in keeping with other government-sponsored alcohol organizations including those at the United Nations.

DATA COLLECTION ISSUES PLAGUE “STANDARDIZATION”

The definitions of “moderate” and “binge” are somewhat based on the extensive research showing that moderate drinkers of alcohol live longer and more illness-free lives than either heavy drinkers or abstainers (with corrections for abstainers who do not drink because of illness or other health issues).

However, those definitions are based on self-reported consumption data from alcohol consumers who may underestimate the number of drinks they consume. In addition, most drinkers do not have a precise idea of exactly what constitutes “a drink.”

In the absence of hard data in large population studies in hundreds of scientific papers, government agencies have basically made a wild guess and decided that the “standard” is one that contains a very small amount of alcohol — 14 grams.

This is a timeworn bureaucratic technique: when the facts aren’t available, make one up.

And thus, the “standard” drink was invented based on a guess with no solid facts at all.

But like so many government pronouncements — especially when UNchallenged by private parties — this bureaucratic invention of convenience has achieved the level of dogma.

Read on …

Wines in China.

Wines in China.

 

Any business with international aspirations will have China in its sights. Consumption of imported wines and spirits is increasing rapidly, particularly in relation to high end products, which are seen as reflecting power and sophistication upon their consumers, or those giving such items as present. The current opportunities for Western brands seem limitless.

However, even if you have dealt with all the bureaucracy and red tape and sorted out your importation and distribution channels with reliable local partners there can still be unforeseen problems. We have recently seen several cases where clients have found that completely unconnected Chinese third parties have registered clients’ trade marks in China, leading to the bizarre situation where any use by clients of their own trade marks in China could infringe those third party rights.

There is no doubt that China is slowly improving its protection for international brands. However in these sorts of cases it is extremely difficult for the genuine brand owner to reclaim its mark, other than through buying it off the owner of the registered mark.

Read on …