Posts Tagged ‘Laws’

 

Beverage makers selling wine, beer and spirits using the freewheeling world of social media are being gently reined in by the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau.

In new guidelines, the federal government declared that sites like Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn are essentially new forms of advertising. As a result, companies selling adult beverages on those sites are subject to advertising rules, according to regulators.

“Social media just exploded in the last few years, and it seems like every week there’s a new way to get your message out there,” said Sara Mann, attorney with Hinman & Carmichael, a San Francisco law firm specializing in the beverage industry. “I think wineries and other suppliers have been confused and a little unsure about what they can and can’t do.”

 

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Chief executive of Majestic Wine says drinkers could turn to beer if multi-buy offers are scrapped

 

Wine could become too expensive for anyone but the wealthy thanks to Government restrictions and taxes, says one major retailer.
A potential ban on multi-buy offers in supermarkets and the recent 10p rise in wine duty could be responsible for drinkers turning to beer instead, according to Stephen Lewis, the chief executive of Majestic Wine.
This could reverse the ‘revolution’ of people enjoying a glass of wine with a meal, he said.
 
A potential ban on multi-buy offers by the Government could lead people to abandon wine for cheaper drinks, says one retailer
‘Having established this culture of food and wine, you know, which is a sea change from where we were 30 years ago, why would we want to stop that?’ Mr Lewis, whose chain has nearly 200 stores in the UK. told the Daily Telegraph.
He said that banning drinks offers in supermarkets would not solve the problem of anti-social behaviour.
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Dante Alighieri.

Dante Alighieri.

 

A winemaking descendant of the poet Dante Alighieri is urging the local government of Veneto to tighten planning laws to protect Valpolicella from urban sprawl.

Count Pieralvise Serego Alighieri, the owner of Serego Alighieri, has said that the combination of lax planning regulations and growing population is putting the countryside at risk.

Along with other producers and environmentalists, he has presented the government with an appeal that demands an immediate freeze on the building of all homes, factories and industrial estates in the area around Valpolicella.

 

 

The appeal adds that as the population of the valley outside Verona has doubled in the past 25 years to over 70,000, the beauty of the countryside is at risk.
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Alcoholism cause 6% of female deaths in Russia.

 

Russia has clamped down on beer sales in the on-going attempt to tackle the country’s alcohol problem.
The new law, which came into effect on 1 January, was agreed by former president Dmitry Medvedev in July 2011 and now classes beer as a liquor.

As with sales of vodka and other spirits, kiosks and beer stalls will be restricted in how much beer they can sell and will not be allowed to sell any at all between 11pm and 8am.

Current president Vladimir Putin, said the step was necessary as he acknowledged the country’s battle with alcoholism, which is the cause of an estimated one in every five male deaths in Russia, according to the World Health Organisation, and 6% of female deaths.
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SwartlandRev_Poster2012FA

 

 

A bunch of South African wine rebels are becoming increasingly law-abiding.
By Rebecca Gibb | Posted Monday, 31-Dec-2012
On a hot spring day in the isolated village of Riebeek Kasteel, a group of bearded men sport Che Guevara-inspired T-shirts and workers’ caps declaring that they are part of “The Swartland Revolution.”

But it’s about time they ditched the “R” in “Revolution,” as the surrounding wine-growing region now appears to be in a happy phase of evolution.

The revolution took place “around 10 years ago when Charles [Back] started Spice Route,” explains Chris Mullineux of Mullineux Wines. “There were around 10 wineries then; today there are 32.”

In the past decade, the region has made its mark, moving from the mass-produced, high-alcohol wines traditionally made in Swartland to carefully crafted, more elegant examples. In terms of exposure, it helped that the people behind the wines were pretty kooky and the wines were not half bad.

While visitors to the region were spreading the word about this unconventional corner of South Africa, the local growers were making gradual changes. Since 2010, a new status quo has been established through rules and regulations.

The local producers formed the Swartland Independent Producers’ Association and introduced a code of practice for all members. It declared that acidification of wines was a no-no, despite relatively low acidities in this region making this a questionable idea.

“The secret of the Swartland is that this is a warm climate so the acidity is low, but the pH is healthy because of the old vines,” explains Mullineux. “If you were a fanatical winemaker, you would probably be tempted to acidify.”

In addition, their charter also states that there must be no yeast additions, so the ferments are all spontaneous; and there must be no chemical supplements to the fermentation, such as pectolytic enzymes, powdered tannins or water additions. Chemical fining is forbidden. Sulfur, which is a common antioxidant and antimicrobial, is allowed, but producers “are encouraged to make moderate additions” only.

The group has a lot of rules, considering that most of its members are non-conformists. Thankfully, for those of us who don’t subscribe to the bigger-is-better school of wine, most of the rules are a welcome relief when so many New World wines taste more like burnt toast, because of overly enthusiastic oak treatment obliterating the fruit. In Swartland, the wines must not be fermented or matured in more than… read on

 

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