Posts Tagged ‘Loose’

Yesterday we revealed the world’s most fattening drinks, and today we look at the other end of the scale and reveal the world’s least calorific alcoholic drinks.

A low calorie message is now being seen as a further way to attract drinkers, beyond just cheap price and promotional offers.

Many winemakers, including E&J Gallo, McWilliams and Banrock Station have all recently released low calorie, low alcohol wines.

Banrock Station’s brand manager, Neil Morolia told db, “Say 5.5% abv to a consumer and most of them will not really understand. Say 60 calories per glass to them and all of a sudden you are talking their language.”

These drinks are in stark contrast to the world’s most fattening drinks, some of which carry more calories than a Big Mac, although they do have much less fat.

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(image courtesy of Aletta Gardner/EWN)

(image courtesy of Aletta Gardner/EWN)

 

As the smoke clears after the unrest in various fruit-growing areas of the Western Cape, and with the next round of protests demanding higher wages for farm labourers and seasonal pickers on its way, the South African wine industry is weighing up the implications to its business model and to the way of life for many among the vineyards.

 

To date, the strike for an increase in the minimum wage from R69 to R150 a day – which has involved the intimidation of farmers and their full-time employees, looting, the destruction of property and the loss of life – has largely been confined to fruit farms that do not produce grapes for making wine.

But with cellars gearing up for the 2013 harvest and the pay dispute apparently no closer to resolution than it was when violence broke out in De Doorns, Wolseley, Grabouw and elsewhere last year, it seems inevitable that more wine farms – especially those using part-time workers – will soon become the focus of attention for the strike leaders as well as the political and criminal factions seeking to gain from the protests.

Should the wine grape harvest this year be seriously disrupted, it is a very real possibility that some farmers could go out of business.

Many will be among those whose only source of income comes from the grapes they sell to wine producers and whose business model revolves around low prices and large tonnage. Others up against the wall will be those making or selling wine whose success hinges more on offering the best prices than it does on the best quality, and who operate in sectors of the market where branding is not a factor.

On the other hand, the South African wine industry also comprises large corporations as well as a number of private wine farm owners with the means to weather the storm.

Many of these stakeholders are already paying way better than the minimum wage while providing their staff with decent accommodation and more, such as crèche and church facilities.

But of as much concern to these stakeholders as the cost implications of having to pay more to their workers or hiring fewer people and opting for increased mechanisation is the straining of the relationships they have with the farm hands and how to embrace a business model revolving more around quality and branding rather than tending to play the price card.

 

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De+Doorns+Jan+10+2013

Protest action on farms during the heart of the picking season will severely hurt the sustainability of farms and could result in job losses, the farmers’ union federation Asuf said on Friday.


The Agri-sector Unity Forum said that ongoing labour unrest in the Western Cape’s fruit producing regions will impact negatively on production, the ability to serve local and international markets and the viability of farms.

“The knock-on effects of higher food prices and retrenchment of workers will follow as enterprises are forced to either or close down,” said Asuf in a statement.

The umbrella body, who represents all major agricultural unions, said the mechanisation or venture into less labour intensive industries would inevitably lead to greater unemployment.

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A CDC survey reports alcohol drinkers consume more calories than recommended, lumping wine in with soda

how-to-loose-belly-fat

Just when Americans are drinking and making merry at holiday parties and dinners, a new survey from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) warns that alcoholic beverages may be adding extra calories to our waistlines. But is it simplistic to lump wine, beer and spirits in with sugary sodas?

Published by the CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics, the survey finds that the average consumer of alcoholic beverages takes in more than their daily-recommended intake for the kinds of calories that come from added sugars, a category that includes beer, wine and spirits. But some experts argue that the survey paints with too broad a brush.

For the survey, the authors examined data from the long-running National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, which involved more than 11,000 people across the country over the age of 20 who provided details on the foods and drinks they consumed in a typical day. The good news is drinkers don’t pass the calorie threshold by much. The survey finds that, on average, Americans who drink daily take in 16 percent of their calories in the form of added sugar. The recommended intake is between 5 percent and 15 percent.

The authors calculated that 12.5 ounces of wine contains roughly 150 calories. So, if drinking in moderation, a man could consume up to… read on

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  • The Big 5 reasons why people should drink wine! (By Johan Botha)

No, it’s not resveratrol!

A Red-Wine Chemical Cuts the Fat.

A Red-Wine Chemical Cuts the Fat.

A recent study found that a chemical in red wine, piceatonnal, may prevent the production of fat in the body, according to Wine Spectator. The study, published in the March issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry, found that subjects experienced up to an 80 percent decrease in fat cell formation when given piceatonnal.

Piceatonnal is the cousin of resveratrol, carrying an additional hydrogen and oxygen molecule. This difference in structure makes piceatonnal more efficient than resveratrol in preventing fat formation because it takes longer for the body to digest, giving it more time to work its magic, according to the article.

Dr. Kee-Hong Kim, co-author of the study, said… read on