Posts Tagged ‘More’

 

Wineries are coming out loud and proud in their support of gay marriage. They’re putting it right on the label.

“Little by little, we’re breaking down the barrier,” says Gary Saperstein of Out in the Vineyard, an events and tour company based in Sonoma wine country that caters to gay travelers.

One of the barrier breakers is Same Sex Meritage, a red blend that sends its message on the bottle and at the cash register: One dollar for every bottle sold is donated to the advocacy group Freedom to Marry.

“It’s the right thing to do,” says Matt Gold, who is based in Chicago and teamed with Josh Stein of Stein Family Wines in California to make the wine, which launched last December. Meritage is a brand name that refers to a Bordeaux-style blend. And, of course, it sounds a lot like marriage.

Gold and Stein see their business partnership as a way to make wine and make a statement. “Everyone should have the right to marry. Everyone should have the same rights as anyone else,” says Gold.

Same Sex Meritage isn’t the only wine reaching out to the LGBT community.

Egalite, a bubbly from the Burgundy region of France, was launched earlier this year with the name French for equality reflecting the wine’s origins as a Burgundy cremant (sparkling wine) and its support for the gay community. Each quarter, a portion of profits is donated to a LGBT nonprofit organization chosen by fans of the wine on Facebook; $15,000 has been donated since the wine’s January launch.

 

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Chief executive of Majestic Wine says drinkers could turn to beer if multi-buy offers are scrapped

 

Wine could become too expensive for anyone but the wealthy thanks to Government restrictions and taxes, says one major retailer.
A potential ban on multi-buy offers in supermarkets and the recent 10p rise in wine duty could be responsible for drinkers turning to beer instead, according to Stephen Lewis, the chief executive of Majestic Wine.
This could reverse the ‘revolution’ of people enjoying a glass of wine with a meal, he said.
 
A potential ban on multi-buy offers by the Government could lead people to abandon wine for cheaper drinks, says one retailer
‘Having established this culture of food and wine, you know, which is a sea change from where we were 30 years ago, why would we want to stop that?’ Mr Lewis, whose chain has nearly 200 stores in the UK. told the Daily Telegraph.
He said that banning drinks offers in supermarkets would not solve the problem of anti-social behaviour.
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Red wine is good for you!

A natural ingredient found in red wine, resveratrol, can help fight off diseases associated with age, a new study shows.
Resveratrol, found in the skin of grapes, has long been touted for its anti-ageing properties.
Researchers are studying this natural compound to help them design better anti-aging drugs.
They think it works by increasing the activity of sirtuins, a family of proteins found throughout the body, which are believed to combat diseases related to getting older, like type 2 diabetes, cancer or Alzheimer’s. Specifically, resveratrol increases the activity of SIRT1, which acts to make our mitochondria — the cell part that turns food into energy in our cells — more efficient, the study says.
The direct link between resveratrol and the SIRT1 protein has been made before, both by the lead author of this latest paper, Harvard genetics professor David Sinclair, and others.
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You might think that a flood of primo wine into the market after one of the best grape harvests ever in 2012 might mean lower prices per bottle. You would be wrong.

Silicon Valley Bank’s State of the Wine Industry 2013 report included a survey of winery operators and found that small price per bottle increases are planned for the year ahead.

That could be because winery owners are seeing a tougher 2013. The report forecasts slower growth in 2013 than in the last two years, dropping from an industrywide 11-15 percent growth in 2012 to 4-8 percent growth in 2013.
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Women who drink red wine enjoy better sex lives, an Italian university study has suggested

Women who drink red wine enjoy better sex lives, an Italian university study has suggested

Women who drink red wine enjoy better sex lives, a study from the University of Florence in Italy has suggested.

A study among Tuscan women discovered that one or two glasses a day could lead to a more fulfilling life in the bedroom.

Experts from the university questioned 800 women between 18 and 50 Santa Maria Annunziata Hospital about their sexual satisfaction.

Using the Female Sexual Function Index – which is used by doctors to assess women and sexual health – it emerged that drinkers scored higher than teetotallers.
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Wine has spoken!

Wine has spoken!

 

The number of pints of beer and cider consumed in the UK will fall by 1.6 billion between now and 2018 the Office of Budget Responsibility has said.
Conversely, the number of 250ml glasses of wine will rise by 856m. While the number of cigarettes smoked will also fall by 9bn.

The numbers are part of the OBR’s forecast estimates regarding social habits, which will determine future tax levels.
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Sulfur dioxide is used to stop wine oxidizing and spoiling, but it can cause health problems for some people. A three-year, $5-million EU-funded project has now discovered a potential replacement for SO2.

European researchers are close to finding an effective alternative to adding sulfur dioxide to red wine and other foodstuffs, which could make future holiday seasons happier and healthier for millions.

Sulfur dioxide (SO2), often labeled as E220, is used as a preservative for certain dried fruits and in winemaking as an antimicrobial and antioxidant. Most people can tolerate a small amount of SO2 in their food and wine, but for others it can cause allergic reactions or have other side effects such as headaches.

The European Union-funded so2say project believes it may now have identified a combination of two extracts that can be used instead. Both of them occur naturally in wine and could reduce the presence of SO2 by more than 95 percent, say researchers.

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New research finds that those who suffer from headaches would pay for less sulfites in their wine.

Sulfur dioxide use in winemaking has been coming under the spotlight as a minimal-intervention movement agitates for less reliance on the compound. Sulfur has taken flak for causing health problems, although the scientific community is divided on the issue.

That prompted a Colorado State University study of consumer perceptions of sulfites and whether drinkers would pay more for a bottle labeled “low in sulfur.”

The findings, published by the American Association of Wine Economists, are that consumers would be willing to pay a little extra — about 64 cents — for wines that contain low levels of sulfites. In comparison, the premium placed on organic wine is $1.22 — nearly double — which suggests public awareness of the addition of sulfur is embryonic.

The researchers offer an alternative explanation. Consumers, in their view, are aware that “organic production protocol prohibits, among other things, the use of added sulfites.” In other words, if drinkers pay the extra for organic wine, low sulfites will be included in the package.

Sulfur dioxide (SO2) — in the form of potassium metabisulfite — is added to most wines and many other food products for its antimicrobial and antioxidant properties. The term “sulfites” on wine labels refers mainly to sulfur dioxide, but also includes sulfurous acid and other sulfites.

But sulfur dioxide is also a natural by-product of fermentation, so it is unlikely an SO2-free wine could ever be produced. Most yeast strains yield 10–20 milligrams per liter of SO2 during fermentation, although some, such as FX10 and M69, produce significantly more than others. Without sulfur, wine is prone to oxidation and spoilage.

Consumers have been asking questions about SO2 since wine labels started to carry a “contains sulfites” message. Sulfite mentions, after all, share label space with warnings that women should not drink during pregnancy, and against drinking and driving.

Although a small number of drinkers suffer ill effects from sulfites,… read on