Posts Tagged ‘Much’

 

 

Our most popular post from last year is brought current with the 2012 financial information. The question at hand is: “How much do wineries really make?
 
The answer of course is ……(drum roll please ….) Not enough. Finding the facts is almost as hard as chasing unicorns in this business because the wine business is private. Its a family owned industry with even the largest; Gallo a family owned company. But its really quite amazing from the perspective of what is shared between neighbors in the wine business. There isn’t the sense that your neighbor is a rival or competitor. Its more of a club feel in many ways. If you need something, its quite normal to check in with your neighbor. Need a tractor because yours went kerput? No problemo. Need a little welding and custom fabrication on a pump? I’ll be right over with a welding rig.
 
There is a competitive side that abounds in the business too of course. When it comes to sharing financial information and customer lists, good luck! Ask a winemaker neighbor how its going financially, and you’ll get a mixture of liars dice, false bravado, partial truths and ….. well ….. 

 

Read on …

The now well-scientifically-established French Paradox — which has driven a wine/health craze since the pivotal 60 Minutes Episode on Nov. 17, 1991 — is all about moderate consumption.

Red wine sales increased 44% after the broadcast … dropped off a bit, then soared again a year later when the program was re-broadcast. As a whole, per-capita consumption in the U.S was in decline until then. And has been on the upswing ever since.

However, wine industry neglect and government guessing, has made the defining of “moderate” an unclear and, perhaps, unhealthy situation.

What’s Moderate? What’s A Drink?

And are you a drunk and don’t know it?

WHAT IS MODERATE DRINKING?

The biggest problem with defining this level concerns how researchers and government agencies gather data.

In general, the vast majority of the hundreds of peer-reviewed scientific studies define “moderate” as 1 drink a day for women and no more than two. For men, that range is 1 to 2 drinks a day but no more than 3 or 4. Weekly consumption for “moderate” is 7 for women and no more than 14 for men.

This site: from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) offers the current definition of Moderate & Binge Drinking. While NIAAA receives almost half a billion dollars per year in tax funds, as far as can be determined, they have never conducted studies on the health benefits of moderate consumption.

That may seem unfair, but they are in keeping with other government-sponsored alcohol organizations including those at the United Nations.

DATA COLLECTION ISSUES PLAGUE “STANDARDIZATION”

The definitions of “moderate” and “binge” are somewhat based on the extensive research showing that moderate drinkers of alcohol live longer and more illness-free lives than either heavy drinkers or abstainers (with corrections for abstainers who do not drink because of illness or other health issues).

However, those definitions are based on self-reported consumption data from alcohol consumers who may underestimate the number of drinks they consume. In addition, most drinkers do not have a precise idea of exactly what constitutes “a drink.”

In the absence of hard data in large population studies in hundreds of scientific papers, government agencies have basically made a wild guess and decided that the “standard” is one that contains a very small amount of alcohol — 14 grams.

This is a timeworn bureaucratic technique: when the facts aren’t available, make one up.

And thus, the “standard” drink was invented based on a guess with no solid facts at all.

But like so many government pronouncements — especially when UNchallenged by private parties — this bureaucratic invention of convenience has achieved the level of dogma.

Read on …

Study reveals less wine being drunk by the French.

Study reveals less wine being drunk by the French.

A surprising 38 per cent of the French don’t drink wine at all, up from 19.2 per cent in 1980.

The French are drinking less wine, very much less.
It is always a shock to the system when nations fail to live up to their stereotypes. Next thing you know, the French will be opposing long lunches, gay marriage, precision in all things and the inalienable right of all Paris waiters to be bloody rude to well-meaning tourists who blunder in saying “Bonjour” rather than “Bonjour monsieur.”
Yes, I can report that the French are putting the brakes on everything except precision because it’s too much fun tormenting those who don’t know precisely how things are done in France. How are they done? Just so. The damask tablecloth is ironed from beneath, the cheeses must not fight each other, do not smile at passersby like an idiot lest you be taken for an American.
There were demonstrations recently against French President François Hollande’s plan to legalize gay marriage. This one I could possibly explain away with the classic definition of marriage as “a friendship recognized by the police.” Perhaps the French were simply supporting the alleged sexual licentiousness of the gay population which will be tamed by marriage, although not by French marriage from what I hear.

Read on …

What is in a bottle?

 

The Journey
Bernie Rooney, owner of Oak Barrel Winecraft in Berkeley, Calif., says you can make a bottle of wine for about $5 or less once you have the equipment. That’s not why people go to the trouble, though. Instead, he says, home winemakers do it to enjoy the journey — from picking the grapes to drinking the wine a year or more later. “If you collect trains, people think you’re strange,” says Paul Taybi, a home winemaker in El Cerrito, Calif. “If you make wine, you get invited to a lot of parties.” In the end, your creation may remind you of Two-Buck Chuck (the bargain producer officially known as Charles Shaw), or a 1998 Chateau Mouton Rothschild –for those who have already drunk a good quantity of wine.
Read on …

The average per annum wine consumption for a Canadian adult is now 15 litres.

 

Wine producers will be proposing a toast to Canadian consumers: a new study shows wine consumption in this country is growing three times faster than globally and Canada is projected to be the fifth fastest-growing wine market in the next five years.

Most of the wine consumed in Canada is imported but “Canada is now very strong on the production side and domestic wines are getting more popular,” said Vinexpo chairman Xavier de Eizaguirre in a telephone interview, speaking from Toronto.

“But the fact there is now a local industry, particularly here in Ontario, is helping the overall picture. Volume-wise it’s certainly a country where consumption is going up. Our forecast is it will continue to go up in the next five years.”

Growing market
De Eizaguirre said Canada’s per capita wine consumption is around 15 litres a year, compared to about 12 in the U.S.

“France, Italy, Spain, the traditional markets, consume somewhere around 50 litres per capita. England is about 25, Argentina is about 45, so there is a lot of potential” for Canada to increase its consumption, he said.

Between 2007 and 2011, Canadian wine consumption increased by 14.55 per cent. Consumption hit 43.21 million cases in 2011; one case represents 12 bottles.

Analysts said that between 2012 and 2016 Canadian wine consumption will go up 14.27 per cent, eventually reaching 50.7 million cases annually, which is three times greater than the global average.

Between 2012 and 2016, China, the United States, Russia and Germany will be ahead of Canada in wine consumption. In the previous five years, Canada was third behind China and the U.S.

“You’ve dropped back because the others have gone quite crazy,” de Eizaguirre said.
Read on …

Natural wine has much to learn...

Natural wine has much to learn from…

 

I can’t look a chicken in the eye anymore unless I ask it first if it’s free range. My family eats organic, right down to the kale. Yes, the natural food movement has changed the way we eat. We consider where our food came from, who grew or produced it, and how far it traveled to get to our plate.

Certainly — to throw some reality-check deionized spring water on the previous paragraph – the vast majority of American eaters are slugging down sugary drinks and sucking down deep-fried McSomething every day, but what was once the fringe domain of a few tofu freaks is now mainstream. You can buy stock in Whole Foods, which took in nearly $12 billion last year, and you can buy organic at Walmart and Costco.

Authors like Michael Pollan and Mark Bittman champion intelligent eating that will help us all live longer. I wonder, though, when those guys sit down to a meal with wine, do they drink organic? I’d like to think so. Laura Klein, publisher of Organic Authority, told me that people who eat organically would also be likely to drink organic, natural or sustainably-produced wine.

“It is a natural extension of their lifestyle,” she wrote me in an email. “Grapes can be one of the most heavily sprayed crops with pesticides, and those who want to limit their exposure to pesticides will probably want to choose wine made with grapes that are grown organically the way mother nature intended: without the use of chemical pesticides that damage the soil, environment and health of the workers that pick those grapes. In fact growers who use pesticides have to pay higher health insurance rates for their workers because of exposure.”

Although you can get organic wines in Whole Foods and Trader Joes, how can you find out more about them, and who are the champions for drinking the good (organic) stuff?
Read on …
Also read:

Prevention better than cure!

Prevention better than cure!

Prevention is better than cure, they say. It’s all well and good curing a hangover, but wouldn’t it be better not to have it in the first place?

1. Know your limits and stick to them.

The hard reality is that seventy five percent of people who imbibe alcohol to intoxication will have a hangover the next day. A hangover is nature’s way of clearing the toxins in alcohol from your body, so the more you pour in, the nastier the hangover will be. The number of alcoholic beverages it takes to reach a state of intoxication varies from person to person and knowing your own limits is important. It’s recommended in some places that you don’t have more than three beverages in any 1 to 2 hour period, and no more than five beverages in one night.
If you’re a woman or of Asian descent, you might want to consider having a little less because your metabolism makes you more susceptible to hangovers. Women tend to have a lower metabolic rate due to a higher ratio of body fat and Asians tend to have lower levels of alcohol dehydrogenase, an enzyme that breaks down alcohol. Pay attention to how different types of alcohol affect you. No matter what the studies say, every person’s ability to metabolize alcohol differs and you’ll know by experience which beer, wine, spirit, or liqueur works for you or plays havoc with your body. Listen to your own body’s reactions and take care accordingly.

Keep in mind that regardless of all the following suggestions, the key solution to hangover prevention is always paying attention to quantity – the less alcohol consumed, the better your chances of avoiding a hangover. Unless you are intending to get really drunk, try drinking one standard drink (can of beer, shot of hard liquor)per hour, which is about the rate at which your liver can keep up. For most people, the most pleasant moment is when the first one kicks in (BAL around .05), and drinking more at that time just moves you away from the “sweet spot.” At one per hour, your blood alcohol level will tend to stay in that range, resulting in more pleasant feeling and less likelihood of doing something stupid.

Read on …

Also read:

The morning after!

The morning after!

Choose white wine rather than red, vodka rather than brandy, and eat before drinking.

Forget strong coffee, cold showers, physical exercise, artichokes, the teaspoon of olive oil before the meal, and all of Grandma’s other recipes: there is no miracle cure for post-party hangovers.

Ninety percent of the French plan to consume alcohol on New Year’s Eve, according to a road safety survey, so New Year’s Day may be a widespread problem.

Dry mouth, jackhammer in the head, upset stomach, nausea, dizziness, dehydration – a hangover does not occur during the evening but several hours later, when the level of alcohol in the blood decreases. It reaches a maximum when the alcohol level reaches zero.

A hangover may occur after consumption of just one glass, with women generally less “resistant” to alcohol than men, but it affects almost everyone beyond five glasses.

Read on …

Also read: