Posts Tagged ‘Reduce’

 

A big drug firm seems less interested in resveratrol-related research; grapes offer heart benefits

A new study provides good news for breast cancer survivors—there is no need to give up wine drinking in moderation. According to a study from the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, drinking before and after breast cancer diagnosis does not impact survival from the disease. In fact, a modest survival benefit was found in women who were moderate drinkers before and after diagnosis due to a reduced risk of dying from cardiovascular disease, a major cause of mortality among breast cancer survivors.

Previous research has linked alcohol consumption to an increased risk of developing breast cancer, though the nature of the link and exact risk of consumption patterns is unclear. For this study, published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, about 5,000 participants with breast cancer were questioned about alcohol consumption habits.

The researchers found that the amount and type of alcohol a woman reported consuming in the years before her diagnosis was not associated with her likelihood from dying from breast cancer. They also discovered that women who consumed three to six drinks per week in the years before their cancer diagnosis were 15 percent less likely to die from cardiovascular disease than non-drinkers. Moderate wine drinkers showed an even lower risk, the study states.

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It is just getting healthier!

 
The health properties of red wine have long been debated but an Australian biochemist believes he has created a drop so loaded with antioxidants that it could treat a range of ills.

Brisbane-based Greg Jardine said he has patented a group of compounds created during the wine-making process which he says act as an anti-inflammatory and could help battle conditions such as arthritis and chronic fatigue.

While previous studies have suggested a small daily intake of wine could help men live longer and may protect against heart disease, they have always been countered by those pointing out the dangers of alcohol consumption.

Jardine, however, believes he has created a palatable drink which could have discernible health-boosting effects.

“We take this antioxidant, which exists in tiny amounts in wine, to a level where it can actually do something,” he told AFP on Tuesday.

Jardine said loading up wine with antioxidants usually made it too tannic and undrinkable, but by also making the antioxidants more fat-soluble, and more easily absorbed by the body, they surprisingly also became more palatable.

“So it’s a double whammy,” he said.

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Excuse me, waiter, but why is my caipirinha glowing?

Researchers in Brazil say they’ve found a faster way to age cachaça, the liquor used to make the country’s signature cocktail, the caipirinha: zap it with gamma radiation.

Cachaça, Brazil’s rum-like spirit, is often bottled as soon as it’s distilled but it can also be aged in barrels for three years or more, giving the spirit greater color, flavor and complexity.

Impatient scientists have discovered that a dose of gamma rays ionizes the cachaça, speeding up chemical reactions that take place naturally during the aging process from years to minutes.

This supercharged version of the sugarcane moonshine known as cachaça carries with it no radiation risk, said Valter Artur of the Nuclear Energy Center at the University of Sao Paolo.

 

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Low-alcohol-drinks-cut-bo-007

 

The International Organisation of Vine and Wine (OIV) has adopted new definitions of low-alcohol and de-alcoholized wines.

The move by the OIV comes amid a rise in the popularity of low-alcohol wines, with producers such as Skinnygirl targeting female consumers in particular. Other winemakers are seeking to reduce the high alcohol content of their more potent wines, created by factors such as better vineyard management and the picking of grapes later (and riper). Some can have alcohol levels of up to 17 percent. Alcohol reduction can also improve the taste balance of particular wines.

Alcohol is reduced or removed using techniques such as spinning cones and reverse osmosis. Conetech, a California-based company which specializes in “alcohol adjustment,” says it treats six million gallons of wine annually from around 600 clients. It also has plants in Chile, Spain, France and South Africa, with Australia soon to follow.

The difficulty is that the rules governing the use of alcohol-reduction technology vary worldwide.

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