Posts Tagged ‘Sweet’

 

Russian consumers have yet to embrace brut sparkling wine despite the efforts of one of the country’s top fizz producers to lure drinkers away from demi-doux.
Speaking at the London International Wine Fair at ExCel this week, Pavel Titov, director of historic Russian sparkling wine estate Abrau-Durso, explained:

“When I joined the company we had 34 different labels in our range. My first decision was to scale it right back and discontinue half of the wines.

“The aim was to get rid of all our demi-doux and demi-sec styles, as I believe brut is the way forward, but this didn’t make commercial sense as Russian consumers are still stuck on sweeter sparklers.

“I wanted to try and change the market trends, but the love of sweeter wines is so deeply ingrained in Russia that it’s hard to influence age-old drinking habits,” he said.

Titov did reveal however that mindsets were starting to change, and that sales of brut are currently the fastest growing within the company, while demi-doux (containing up to 45g of residual sugar) remains Abrau-Durso’s best seller.
“Half of our production is demi-doux at the moment in order to satisfy demand, while we make 35% brut and around 15% demi-sec – people tend to buy the extremes in Russia, either really dry or really sweet,” Titov told db.

 

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Don't forget the consumers with a sweet tooth!

Don’t forget the consumers with a sweet tooth!

 

The wine industry is failing to keep up with changing tastes among consumers, according to drinks analyst Jonny Forsyth of Mintel, speaking at the LIWF today.

 

Forsyth said consumers are becoming increasingly sweet toothed and adventurous in the products they choose.

 

However, he added, unlike other industries the wine trade is failing to keep up, to its commercial detriment.

 

Forsyth said: “Consumers are evolving, I’m not convinced that wine is evolving quite enough to follow this.”

 

He added sugar consumption in the UK had risen by 31% since 1990, with the average Brit now consuming 700g of sugar each week while in the US each American consumes 130lb of sugar per year.

 

Forsyth said the impact can already be seen in the industry, with rosé now having a market share in the UK of 11%, up from just 1% 10 years ago.

 

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Vin de Constance.

Vin de Constance.

 

A mention of Klein Constantia’s Vin de Constance in E L James’ novel 50 Shades Darker has sparked unprecedented interest in the South African sweet wine.

The 2004 vintage makes an appearance in the second book of the 50 Shades erotictrilogy at a masked ball attended by the novel’s protagonists, Christian Grey and Anastasia Steele.

Vin de Constance 2004 is enjoyed with the third course at the charity event, paired with sugared-crusted walnut chiffon candied figs, sabayon sauce and maple ice cream.
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italian-wine1

 

 

The third of our 10-part analysis on Australian wine trends considers the country’s embrace of Italian grapes and newfound success with the Moscato wine style.

Although the planting of Mediterranean varieties from Greece, Spain and Portugal is in vogue, it’s the potential of those from Italy that really seems to be exciting winemakers Down Under.

Historically, as André Bondar, at McLaren Vale’s Mitolo, records: “Australia used to plant French varieties regardless,” but today growers are realising that many Italian grapes are more suitable to certain climates in Australia.

For Corrina Wright, director at McLaren Vale grower and producer Oliver’s Taranga: “Italian varieties in general are gaining traction because they have high natural acidity and a lovely texture and they are well adapted to heat spikes.”

Notably she has planted five acres of Sagrantino. “We’ve had it for 12 years and it’s hard to grow and low cropping, but produces wines with fabulous tannins.” She would like to plant white grape Greco too, she says, but has run out of vineyard space.

For many, Sangiovese elicits excitement. Coriole’s Mark Lloyd points out that he was the first to grow Sangiovese in the country, having planted it in 1985 in the McLaren Vale because, he recalls: “It was going to be the antithesis of big, sweet Shiraz.”

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Bordeaux 1998

Château d’Yquem

 

Rain ruined harvest for top property; neighbors argue that buyers should not dismiss vintage
Pierre Lurton, managing director of Château d’Yquem, said that the legendary 250-acre Bordeaux estate will not produce a 2012 Sauternes due to insufficient quality. “We tried everything possible, but nature didn’t give us a choice,” Lurton told Wine Spectator.

Horribly wet weather during harvest this year left Yquem with grapes for just 800 cases of sweet wine rather than the usual 8,000 to 10,000 (worth roughly $33 million in sales), so the financial dice had already been thrown, said Lurton. And what remained lacked the Premier Grand Cru Supérieur estate’s hallmark concentration and complexity, he added.

“Why release it? To show we’re present in a vintage? Economically and for the image of Yquem, it would not have been the best demonstration,” said Lurton. Normally the wine might have gone into a second wine, but Yquem doesn’t make one. Instead it will likely be declassified and sold off in bulk. The estate did produce 10,000 bottles of its dry white wine, “Y,” picked prior to the rains, but the sweet wine simply failed to pass muster. “We were not convinced of the quality. It’s rare but it happens.”

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champagne-jacquart-demi-sec-tradition-

Demi-sec has become the elephant in the room in Champagne, according to one of the region’s top winemakers.

Jacquart’s chief winemaker Floriane Eznack
Speaking to the drinks business at a tasting lunch at Chrysan in London last week, Champagne Jacquart’s chief winemaker Floriane Eznack said: “Our demi-sec sales are growing, but it’s the wine we don’t talk about.

“There’s still a prejudice surrounding the style. In the past people would add sugar to their Champagne to hide faults so it has a negative connotation.

“No one likes to talk about demi-sec in the region, but a lot of people like to drink it. The style isn’t going out of fashion, if anything it’s getting more popular.”

Since joining Jacquart last year after four years at Veuve Clicquot, Eznack has drastically scaled back the Jacquart range from 18 lines to just six.

“It was a bit of a nightmare when I started ­– we had all these different non-vintage Champagnes and three prestige cuvées. It was important to reduce the range to give it more focus,” she told db.

Eznack is currently fine-tuning a new prestige cuvée to be released next year.

“We haven’t finalised the name yet, but it will be a vintage Champagne from our best Premier and Grand Cru sites,” she said.

The wine will not replace the house’s current prestige cuvée, 50/50 Chardonnay, Pinot Noir non-vintage blend Brut de Nominée, but rather slot in above it.
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