Posts Tagged ‘technology’

Google Analytics are awesome.

They’re free, easy to set up, and tell you everything you need to know about how your website is performing.

But, they also encompass a confusing array of data, can be time-consuming to set up, and involve a dictionary of Google-speak.  (What is a visit versus a pageview anyway?)

Don’t worry if you don’t have hours to dive into this.  Here are three key stats to look at to see if your site is on track at the highest level.

Mobile %
The percentage of website traffic coming from mobile devices jumped from 17.5% in Q3 2012 to 23.1% in Q4 2012, according to a new report from Walker Sands.  On the Vin65 platform, our clients average about 17%.  To find out what yours is:

1.Select Audience
2.Select Mobile
3.Select Overview
4.Choose your viewing option.  We chose the pie chart.
Implication? This example shows a smaller viewership – only 4.4% are on mobile.  But if you are one of the wineries where 1 out of every 5 of your customers are on a mobile device, you better make sure that your mobile site and cart are optimized or you could be losing valuable sales.

To take this a step further, drill down to remove iPads.  Why?  Because iPads are “mobile” in the Google Analytics world but tend to use computer monitor resolution.  So if you’re trying to see if you need to redesign your site for the small screen, this is important.

To do this:

1.Select Devices
2.Select advanced search
3.Select Exclude, then choose Mobile Device Info
4.Type in iPad

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Digital Darwinism I define as this era when society and technology are evolving faster than the ability for many businesses to adapt.

Digital Darwinism I define as this era when society and technology are evolving faster than the ability for many businesses to adapt.

 

Across many areas social media has become an increasingly important avenue for promotion and the alcohol industry is no different.
Last year a leading expert told the drinks business that social media is now so important to the wine world that wineries who put off using it will experience “digital Darwinism”.

Social media gives brands a fresh way to communicate with their consumers; Twitter and Facebook offer a scale of brand-consumer interaction that has previously not existed.

While some brands are clearly better than others at using social media a recent study by the L2 think tank showed that beer brands in particular are lagging behind other industries. The think tank assessed the digital competency of beer brands in the US and found that just two, Heineken and Budweiser, earned a “Genius” ranking.

L2′s report said: “On the social media front, Heineken had very little competition, nabbing the top spot for most Facebook fans, most Facebook engagement, most Twitter followers (aggregate global feeds), biggest YouTube community, and most individual YouTube channel views.

 

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Wine is social. Sure, you can drink it solo, but it’s best enjoyed with friends, food and conversation.  Selling wine is social, too. Canny wine marketers know this in their bones. The job isn’t about moving a bottle of wine across a counter. That’s just the transaction. The job is about great service, gonzo enthusiasm and killer personality.

They approach a customer, ask the right questions, listen carefully, suggest wisely. If the customer goes away smiling and the wine is a hit, the customer will come back. And next time, bring friends.

If any industry is tailored for social media, it’s wine. The proof is in the data. According to VinTank, a social media software company for the wine business, 14 million people have mentioned wine online at some point, a number that grows by 450,000 people every month. And they’re talking a lot, having 1.5 million conversations about wine online—every single day.

The bulk of this chatter happens on mainstream social networks like Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, plus wine-centric apps like CellarTracker and Delectable. People post tasting notes, bottle shots, and ratings from 88 points to Yuck to Wow! They tag their friends, who share it too. Think of social media as the breeding ground for digital word of mouth.

Now, producers, retailers, restaurateurs and buyers have joined the conversation. Getting up to speed in social media means learning a new technology, but that’s not so different from learning a new point-of-sale system (and arguably a little easier). Happily, many wine pros find that success online requires the same kind of sensitivity and savoir-faire their jobs demand in real life.

“Customers are going to talk whether you’re listening or not,” says VinTank’s CEO, Paul Mabray. “You’d answer the phone if they called you. You’d answer an email. It’s fundamental customer service to answer a tweet, or a post on your Wall. And you don’t answer in stupid promotional ways. You just say, ‘Hey, how are you doing?’”

But social media success does require a slight shift in thinking. Traditional marketing was about push. A marketer publishes a notice about a holiday sale, or the arrival of a scarce Bordeaux, hoping customers will come pouring in.

Social media is about pull. Instead of broadcast-and-pray, a marketer goes where the customers are, connects with them, and engages with them on their terms.
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Also read:

Truffles coming to a vineyard near you!

Truffles coming to a vineyard near you!

 

The truffle trend is coming to a vineyard near you.
Thanks to new technology—which allows young oak and chestnut tree roots to be inoculated with black truffle spores—several U.S. wine producers are planting the tasty tuber melanosporum alongside their Pinot and Cab.

Growing secondary crops on a vineyard promotes biodiversity and is key to the long-term health of the land, says Robert Sinskey, of Sinskey Vineyards, which is home to Napa Valley’s first truffle orchard. And given the fact truffles are in such high demand—selling for as much as $1,200 a pound—planting an orchard made perfect sense.

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For over 3 years, we have worked closely with the Burgundy School of Business both as a company – hiring interns to work with the EWBC, and as a research engine – helping us conduct field studies on various subjects. This year, Aymeric Dehont conducted a host of research for us, which eventually inspired him to create a paper on the fragile relationship between wine and social media. We appreciate Aymeric’s hard work putting together his thoughts and trust you will share your feedback with him. Keep in mind this is from a very European perspective.

How to improve the use of social media in the wine business?

Introduction:

As a Masters student in Wine Business in Dijon, the regional capital of Burgundy, I’ve continuously questioned myself on many issues within the wine and spirits sector. Yet, one of the most debated subjects has been the apparent effectiveness of social media. After attending the EWBC – Digital Wine Communications Conference, I have come to under that the wine & spirits industry, in general, hasn’t succeeded in its use of these new tools. Therefore, I wanted to get a better understanding on how to improve digital communication and what would be the ideal online strategy to follow.

This paper will provide a brief analysis of how social media is currently affecting the wine industry based on articles, marketing analysis and knowledge.

Social media and the impact on marketing

It is true that social media has attracted an inordinate amount of people over the last two decades and currently, almost everyone is using at least one of its platforms. In large part, this is because interaction between each other, and the community, has always been a basic need for humans, referring to the very famous Maslow’s hierarchy of needs pyramid.

As observed in the Nielsen Social Media Report 2012, social media is mainly used when watching TV in order to interact and function as ‘social care’ for customer service. Approximately, 47% of social media users were actively involved in social care. In 2011, more than 80% of the Fortune 500 companies were using some form of social media to connect with consumers.

Companies that are using these tools efficiently are not advertising, but instead creating bonds between themselves and the consumer; thereby establishing loyalty. The customer isn’t considered as an asset anymore, but as a person to interact with and to satisfy. Bear in mind that social media is made to connect remotely between humans, and being “connected” means interacting with each other. Advertizing is not an effective means to create a relationship with people, but rather a means to provide a straightforward message to the consumer without receiving direct feedback. 30% of consumers found advertising on social media annoying and only 25% are willing to pay attention to it, which proves that the use of social media is totally different from regular advertizing campaigns.

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Alchohol aware ice cubes.

Alchohol aware ice cubes.

 

An Indian student at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, has created digital ice cubes that warn people when they’ve had enough to drink.

Last year, engineering student Dhairya Dand found himself in hospital after he overdid it on a night out.
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Digital snapshots may make cute holiday memories for all to share, but now a similar technology may soon help create superb Syrahs or marvelous Merlots. Researchers have created a new way to peer inside a grape to identify its composition and variety through computer imaging. This could cut back on laborious chemical analysis for winemakers.

Francisco José Rodríguez Pulido, a researcher at the Univ. of Seville, says that the new system could work for both small growers as well as large companies.

“The cultivation of the vine and the production of quality red wines are facing serious problems due to high temperatures and climate change,” says Pulido, adding that it makes it difficult for growers to know when to pick. “Usually, there is a gap between the pulp and the seed maturation, particularly in red grapes,” which means that the different parts of each grape mature at different speeds, making it tough to pick at the right moment to maximize phenols – the coveted flavor notes that contribute to taste, color and mouthfeel.

Pulido says that the process takes just a few minutes. A camera snaps a high-resolution picture of the seeds. Then, customized software identifies the seeds in the image and measures their color according to a standardized index of colors

The close relationship between appearance and chemical composition makes it possible to estimate how mature the seeds are – which is a good indication of when to pick the grapes. The process was tested and proven in Spanish grapes, but Pulido says that it should work in any type of red or white wine.

Pulido and his colleagues published their research on the new method in the journal Analytica Chimica Acta.

Gregory Balint, a professor at the Oregon Wine Research Institute, says that determining grape maturity is a toilsome process, and a digital tool could help – but he is not convinced that color is the best way to determine ripeness. “I couldn’t see any correlation between basic data like soluble solids, acidity and pH and these colorimetric parameters,” he says.

“Many winemakers are still using these basic parameters to schedule the best time for harvesting. Moreover, many winemakers and growers are using the sensory evaluation of the berries, including seeds, to assess the maturity levels,” says Balint. He adds that winemakers could use something like this method in conjunction with other tools.
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On-Facebook-Wine-Glass

 

Facebook Gifts enables members of legal age to buy and ship wine to one another

You can’t respond to a Facebook friend request with a wine request … yet. But you can now legally buy and send wine to your Facebook friends who are 21 or older and live in a state where direct-to-consumer wine shipping is permitted.

Facebook Gifts debuted this past Tuesday, offering the social network’s 1 billion users the chance to buy real-life gifts—options range from Williams-Sonoma gourmet snacks, to Sky Mall-type gadgets, to wine—for their Facebook friends. Facebook Gifts debuts just one month after Amazon introduced its own long-anticipated wine sales portal. Facebook’s wine sales are being facilitated through ShipCompliant, which claims more than 2,000 winery clients throughout the United States. Both Facebook wine giver and receiver must be age 21 or older and, as with all wine shipments, the delivery must be signed for by an adult with a valid ID.

The number of ShipCompliant wine brands available through Facebook Gifts is growing, with nearly a dozen available at press time, including Amuse Bouche, Blackbird, Captûre, Domaine Chandon and Robert Mondavi Winery. Current selections range in price from $14 to $90, with an additional charge of $15 to $20 for processing, handling and… read on

Social media and online purchasing is significantly influencing wine sales in mainland China, and to a lesser degree in Hong Kong, reports Stephen Quinn.

 

As the wine business matures, its China and Hong Kong players are embracing social media to sell to an increasingly sophisticated audience.

Thomas Jullien, Asia representative for the Bordeaux Wine Council says: “We are seeing a boom in social networking in China.” He adopted a web 2.0 focus last year because of the ability to measure results in a more powerful way than with traditional advertising.

Facebook and Twitter are banned in mainland China, but the country has its local equivalents: Renren and Sina Weibo, respectively.

Jullien set up a Sina Weibo account in the middle of 2011. In six months it had gathered 40,000 followers. “It is a direct channel to talk to people about Bordeaux wine,” he says.

Every year, the Bordeaux Wine Council runs seminars in at least 20 Chinese cities for people in the trade. Jullien uses Sina Weibo to publicise these events: “At the seminars we always check where people found out about them. A very high proportion found out through someone ‘re-tweeting’ Sina Weibo. It is so useful to be able to measure feedback by monitoring social networks.”

According to Jullien, Bordeaux sales in China have doubled every year for the past six years. He attributes recent sales success to engaging with people curious about wine.

WINE’S OWN NETWORKS

David Pedrol is Shanghai and Hong Kong product director for yesmywine.com, the most successful online platform on the mainland with more than 5.2 million members, which sells 15,000 bottles daily.

When people buy wine they see how many bottles have already been sold of that wine. For example, as of mid-June the company has sold 121,066 bottles of La Bastide Laurent red. The internet accounts for 70% of all wine sold in China, according to Pedrol. His is also the only company in China with its own wine-focused social network: i-Cellar. However like the Bordeaux Wine Council, it uses the big Chinese social networks.

Sina Weibo has about 300 million registered users, Renren roughly 100 million users, though accurate data, crucially on the number of active users, can be difficult to extrapolate.

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