Posts Tagged ‘Top’

(by Gemma Correll)

 

My sixth Wine Bloggers Conference was approached with trepidation. I’ve been questioning the utility of the semantics of “blogger” and “wine blogger” of late. Also, I knew nothing of Penticton, British Columbia. Finally, very few of my closer blogging-friends and colleagues would be in attendance.

The format was the same. Bring together “wine bloggers” in a wine region to discover that region, learn about wines from other parts of the world, explore their wine writing avocation amongst their peers and strengthen the camaraderie of the group. It turns out my trepidation was without merit. It was a very successful conference for me despite nearly coughing up my lungs with a nasty bout of the flu. I learned a lot this weekend.

1. Modern Greek Vin Santo is an amazing wine and should be discovered by all wine lovers.

2. Lungs can’t actually be “coughed up”, but you can exercise and tighten up your stomach muscles in the process of discovering it’s not possible.

3. Penticton, British Columbia really is a “must visit” for serious wine lovers, and its “Penticton Lakeside Resort” was the most beautiful venue yet for a Wine Bloggers Conference.

4. It would do all wine bloggers good to focus equally as much on the quality of their writing as on the extent of their wine knowledge.

 

Read on …

The Bourbon brand, Jim Beam.

The Bourbon brand, Jim Beam.

 

The drinks business has compiled a list of the current top 10 spirit brands by global volume sales.

While the majority of entries in this year’s top 10 retained their 2012 ranking, there was a new entry from innovative Bourbon brand Jim Beam, while movers in the pack included German digestif Jägermeister and Irish cream liqueur Baileys.

The ability for brands to refresh and reinvent themselves was a core contributing factor to our top 10’s success this year, with new flavoured variants being released thick and fast in the vodka category, and Bacardi giving two new flavours a go on the rum front.

White spirits put in a strong performance this year, but was it enough to stave off the seemingly unstoppable charge of super Scotch Johnnie Walker, voted the number one brand in The Drinks Business Power Brands 2013 list?

 

Read on …

 

Winemaking is an 8,000-year-old tradition, and the first wines tasted … well, terrible.

 

People added ash, resin and even lead to “enhance” the flavor . Luckily, most wines today are pretty darn tasty on their own, thanks to modern fermentation techniques and innovations in packaging that help your wine stay fresher longer, and you certainly don’t have to worry that a wine-maker used lead to improve his product’s flavor!

We’ve also seen a big shift in where we produce wine. Once considered a hoity-toity European beverage, wine is made and drunk all over the world, and you’re as likely to find a decent glass of red at your neighborhood pizza joint as at a fancy French restaurant.

Winemakers have also gotten more conscious of their environmental impacts. Since a good wine starts with the grape, and good grapes start with good soil, the wine industry has stayed on the cutting edge of sustainable agriculture. Any vintner worth his salt knows that protecting the environment is more than just good for the planet — it’s good for his wines.

With such a long history, there have been lots of innovations through the centuries, from how winemakers grow grapes to how they market those bottles. Let’s look at 10 of them.
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The drinks business has compiled a list of the current top 10 Champagne brands by global volume sales.

While there are few dramatic changes to this year’s rankings – the slide by Piper Heidsieck was widely forecasted as a result of the brand’s recent repositioning – what does stand out is the decline in sales seen by so many of these major players in the Champagne category.

For many consumers, especially in more traditional markets, Champagne stands firm as the ultimate celebratory drink. However, this slide in sales appears to be the result of two aligning forces: ongoing economic difficulties in some of the category’s biggest markets and the growing competition Champagne faces from an increasingly ambitious sparkling wine market.

Read on to find out which brands are dominating today’s Champagne market.

Read on …

Neft Vodka ad...

 

New research suggests that market leaders in the alcohol industry are being left behind in social video marketing because “they are not optimising their content for social web”.
Video technology company Unruly, has published a report called “Untapped Potential: The State of Sharing in the Alcohol Sector”, which found that despite enjoying significant growth in the last quarter, a staggering 97% of the alcohol sector’s video shares came from just four adverts. The four ads, which came from Budweiser, Carlsberg, Heineken and little-known Russian-Austrian vodka brand, Neft, represent less than 1% of the alcohol adverts released in 2013.

The report also suggests that market leaders such as Diageo and SAB Miller are lagging behind in social video sharing, while wine brands have remained the slowest to embrace social video, attracting less than 1% of the sharing activity during the final quarter of 2012 and the first of 2013. This trend was also noticeable earlier this year, when db revealed the Top 10 brands ruling social media.

Ian Forrester, Unruly’s insight director, said: “The research found that some of the big alcohol brands – and subsectors – are vastly underperforming in social video.

“For wine and spirit brands, the opportunity to increase brand awareness and sales conversion rates through social video is huge, as there has been very little mass movement from these brands in creating shareable video content.

“Additionally, leading brands like Diageo and SAB Miller that have very strong market share are lagging behind competitors when it comes to social video share of voice.”

The report also highlighted the impact of spirits brands on beer brands, which historically dominate alcohol advertising. Beer brands’ share of voice dropped from 97% in the fourth quarter of 2012 to 75% in the first quarter of 2013.

The report also published details of the most shared alcohol videos of all time, and you can click through the following pages to find out which these videos were.
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Digital Darwinism I define as this era when society and technology are evolving faster than the ability for many businesses to adapt.

Digital Darwinism I define as this era when society and technology are evolving faster than the ability for many businesses to adapt.

 

Across many areas social media has become an increasingly important avenue for promotion and the alcohol industry is no different.
Last year a leading expert told the drinks business that social media is now so important to the wine world that wineries who put off using it will experience “digital Darwinism”.

Social media gives brands a fresh way to communicate with their consumers; Twitter and Facebook offer a scale of brand-consumer interaction that has previously not existed.

While some brands are clearly better than others at using social media a recent study by the L2 think tank showed that beer brands in particular are lagging behind other industries. The think tank assessed the digital competency of beer brands in the US and found that just two, Heineken and Budweiser, earned a “Genius” ranking.

L2′s report said: “On the social media front, Heineken had very little competition, nabbing the top spot for most Facebook fans, most Facebook engagement, most Twitter followers (aggregate global feeds), biggest YouTube community, and most individual YouTube channel views.

 

Read on …

10 Reasons why women should drink wine!

10 Reasons why women should drink wine!

 

The red wine is useful if you don’t drink too much. There are some benefits about drinking some red wine for you, women! Have a look:

1) Red wine making your skin younger, i.e. a kind of anti-aging.

 

2) Red wine helping you to sleep better.

 

3) Red wine helping your stomach.

 

4) Red wine increasing your appetite. If you need to eat more food, it’s a good decision.

 

5) Red wine making you stronger. This is a kind of tonic effect.

 

Read on …

(Image by Hanson Chiropractic Center)

(Image by Hanson Chiropractic Center)

 

When it comes to the secrets of living to 100, the life-giving properties of alcoholic drinks have featured in the top tips from many centenarians.
There have been many health benefits associated with alcohol, when consumed in moderation, including battling lung cancer, lowering cholesterol and helping with arthritis.

Recent celebrants include Helen Kimsey from Lincolnshire, who celebrated her 100th birthday in February saying that a glass of white wine was her secret. While in March Jim Baines from Norfolk reached his 100th birthday saying that a regular drink of Guinness was the key.

Simone from Paris celebrated her 104th birthday with a glass (or two) of Drappier Champagne. Simone’s daughter, who is herself in her 80s, said that the drink “keeps you young”. Yesterday we revealed that new research has suggested that three glasses of Champagne every week can help boost memory and stave off Alzheimer’s and dementia.

So we have looked back at the tips from a number of centenarians, who have answered that common question on a 100th birthday: “What is the secret to a long life?”

If you want to get your telegram from the Queen, then these are the top tips from those who have been there and done that.

 
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As the wine director at Jaynes Gastropub, I am constantly trying to edge people away from the common toward the lesser-known grape varieties and wines. Like pinot noir? Then try nebbiolo. Like Syrah? Then consider a blend from Provence. When it comes to the diners seeking “big” wines, such as cabernet, merlot or malbec, I have one secret weapon and that is Rioja.

Rioja can be either red, white or rosé. The red is made from what I consider to be Spain’s greatest grape, tempranillo, blended with smaller amounts of garnacha, graciano and mazuelo. Tempranillo is a variety that shares some characteristics with nebbiolo and pinot noir: thin-skinned, light in hue yet very bold with the ability to yield highly complex and utterly delicious wines. Rioja is also somewhat reminiscent of French Bordeaux, with strong oak integration, albeit American white oak instead of French wood. In the end, this wine is utterly Spanish and well worth seeking out. Here are a few recommendations:

A 2008 C.V.N.E. Vina Real Crianza is an excellent entry-level Rioja and very approachable when young. The vanilla characteristics of the American oak blends beautifully with the red cherry and berry fruits. This particular wine comes from the Rioja Alavesa region. The Vina Real Reserva is a very modestly priced wine, generally around $16 retail, from a fifth-generation producer. (Available at Bine and Vine on Adams Avenue.)

My all-time favorite Rioja producer is R. Lopez De Heredia from the city of Haro in La Rioja Alta. It makes some of the most traditional wines in the region with 135-year-old cellars filled with cobwebs, spiders and dust, the antithesis of the spit-shined and pressure-washed modern winery. Lopez, as it is affectionately called by American wine geeks, holds back vintages before release longer than just about any other producer and creates some of the most interesting wines in the world, including a 13-year-old new release rosé. The winery’s current-release Crianza is the 2005 Vina Cubillo Crianza, available by the bottle at one of the best wine restaurants in San Diego — Costa Brava in Pacific Beach. Owner Javier Gonzalez and I share a mutual love for this winery.

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The days of grocery aisles stocked with Edwardian-Scripted wine bottles are hopefully close to being a thing of the past. Our favorite old-school alcoholic beverage is getting a fresh face with innovations in both the design of the label and the container itself.

We’ve picked 50 of some of the best designs—and while we can’t vouch for the stuff inside—the look of them is enough to get your salivary glands going.
Read on …