Posts Tagged ‘Trends’

You devil, you!

You devil, you!

 

 

We consider the fast-growing interest and investment in Tasmania in our second of ten installments on Australia’s evolving wine industry.

In keeping with Australia’s continued search for yet cooler regions and leaner wine styles, its southernmost state, Tasmania, is becoming one of the most fashionable sources for grapes.

The fact the so-called Apple Isle exhibits a similar climate to New Zealand – both North and South Islands – is a further incentive for Australian winemakers, particularly those attempting to produce Down Under’s best Pinot Noir.

While plantings of Pinot Noir and Chardonnay may be nothing new to Tasmania, grapes once exclusively destined for sparkling wine – the island’s most famous export – are increasingly being used to make still wines.

And proof of the island’s quality potential has been powerful in recent times: for example, Penfold’s Yattarna 2008 was crowned best Chardonnay in the inaugural James Halliday Chardonnay Challenge in September, and the famous producer had sourced 89% of its grapes from Tasmania in this vintage.

As Peter Gago admitted in a meeting with the drinks business at the end of last year, “If there is a trend in Yattarna Chardonnay, it’s that there’s more and more Tasmanian fruit in it” – pointing out that 96% of the Chardonnay in the more recent 2010 vintage had come from the island.

However, with the other 4% from the Adelaide Hills, he added, “Tasmania is more important but not all important”.

Meanwhile, Australia’s prestigious Jimmy Watson Trophy was won by the Glaetzer Dixon Family’s Mon Père Shiraz 2010, which was made exclusively from grapes grown on the Apple Isle.

Read on …

 

italian-wine1

 

 

The third of our 10-part analysis on Australian wine trends considers the country’s embrace of Italian grapes and newfound success with the Moscato wine style.

Although the planting of Mediterranean varieties from Greece, Spain and Portugal is in vogue, it’s the potential of those from Italy that really seems to be exciting winemakers Down Under.

Historically, as André Bondar, at McLaren Vale’s Mitolo, records: “Australia used to plant French varieties regardless,” but today growers are realising that many Italian grapes are more suitable to certain climates in Australia.

For Corrina Wright, director at McLaren Vale grower and producer Oliver’s Taranga: “Italian varieties in general are gaining traction because they have high natural acidity and a lovely texture and they are well adapted to heat spikes.”

Notably she has planted five acres of Sagrantino. “We’ve had it for 12 years and it’s hard to grow and low cropping, but produces wines with fabulous tannins.” She would like to plant white grape Greco too, she says, but has run out of vineyard space.

For many, Sangiovese elicits excitement. Coriole’s Mark Lloyd points out that he was the first to grow Sangiovese in the country, having planted it in 1985 in the McLaren Vale because, he recalls: “It was going to be the antithesis of big, sweet Shiraz.”

Read on …

Kangaroo Crossing

The Australian wine industry is awash with change and we have identified the key alterations taking place Downunder.
From new style whites to single block reds, winemakers and brand owners are displaying a restless urge to experiment, embracing new practices in the vineyard and cellar.

As for plantings, there’s a surprisingly broad array of grapes going into the ground (particularly from the Mediterranean) as producers search for the best match between variety and climate, along with soil type.

Meanwhile, it’s clear Australia is embracing its cooler-climate regions, creating lighter wines, and working harder to express specific sites.

Improved viticultural practices in particular are key to Australia’s vinous evolution, with more suitable clones, older vines and better soil management all making their mark.

Helping capture changes in the vineyard are earlier harvest times, gentler fermentation practices and reduced new oak use, and overall, as Mark Lloyd from McLaren Vale’s Coriole told db, “Today the Australian wine industry is in a sweet spot.”
Read on …

The Hong Kong wine scene.

The Hong Kong wine scene.

 

There is a burgeoning wine industry in Hong Kong where consumer demand is rising and tastes are changing, while high profile events and bloggers spread the emerging trends, finds Alasdair Nichol

 

THE WINE industry in Hong Kong has come a long way since the dropping of import duties in 2008 and wine drinkers in the city are becoming more adventurous with the expanded wealth of wine options on offer.

The upsurge in wine pairing with Chinese food has opened new doors to experiences that local drinkers would not have otherwise explored.

Also, the traditional wines usually consumed are being caught up by demand for new and more interesting varieties from differing wine producing countries around the world.

Take a peek at the top 10 trends currently making waves in the Hong Kong market.