Posts Tagged ‘using’

Digital Darwinism I define as this era when society and technology are evolving faster than the ability for many businesses to adapt.

Digital Darwinism I define as this era when society and technology are evolving faster than the ability for many businesses to adapt.

 

Across many areas social media has become an increasingly important avenue for promotion and the alcohol industry is no different.
Last year a leading expert told the drinks business that social media is now so important to the wine world that wineries who put off using it will experience “digital Darwinism”.

Social media gives brands a fresh way to communicate with their consumers; Twitter and Facebook offer a scale of brand-consumer interaction that has previously not existed.

While some brands are clearly better than others at using social media a recent study by the L2 think tank showed that beer brands in particular are lagging behind other industries. The think tank assessed the digital competency of beer brands in the US and found that just two, Heineken and Budweiser, earned a “Genius” ranking.

L2′s report said: “On the social media front, Heineken had very little competition, nabbing the top spot for most Facebook fans, most Facebook engagement, most Twitter followers (aggregate global feeds), biggest YouTube community, and most individual YouTube channel views.

 

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Champagne and the use of oak.

Champagne and the use of oak.

 

While there is no consensus on the use of oak in Champagne production, Michael Edwards considers when it can have a beneficial effect
NOT SO long ago, a sure-fire way of generating a heated argument between winemakers in Champagne (as in Chablis) was to talk about the virtues and pitfalls of making their best, purest wine in oak. There’s one fine grower in a grand cru village, a charming and highly educated man, who grows apoplectic at the thought of his precious Champagne being sullied by a single wooden stave. Certainly since the late 1960s, stainless steel has become the overwhelmingly preferred medium of fermentation in Champagne – because in tank, control of the grape’s journey into wine is complete and it’s easier to use. By the early 1990s, only a few perfectionists led by Krug, Bollinger and Selosse stayed true to their barrels and casks.
Fruits of the forest

How things change. Twenty years on, it’s reckoned that about 100 Champagne producers use oak in one form or other: to ferment the wine, partially or fully, to age the reserve wines or, easily forgotten, when making the wine for the dosage – a crucial skill.

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Beverage makers selling wine, beer and spirits using the freewheeling world of social media are being gently reined in by the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau.

In new guidelines, the federal government declared that sites like Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn are essentially new forms of advertising. As a result, companies selling adult beverages on those sites are subject to advertising rules, according to regulators.

“Social media just exploded in the last few years, and it seems like every week there’s a new way to get your message out there,” said Sara Mann, attorney with Hinman & Carmichael, a San Francisco law firm specializing in the beverage industry. “I think wineries and other suppliers have been confused and a little unsure about what they can and can’t do.”

 

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Learn how to promote your wine events better.

Learn how to promote your wine events better.

 

While using social media or any kind of mail, e or snail, it can be difficult to stay on the correct side of the line between “how very interesting” and “report spam.” When done right, postcards, email and Facebook can be great ways to get the word out and keep your audience clued in about your winery’s upcoming events.

In the case of all 3, make sure that the names in your database were volunteered and not harvested from another online source by you or a broker. Trust in mailing lists has been declining for a while now thanks to their abuse. However, if your recipients asked to receive updates then your response rates will directly reflect that vote of confidence.

Postcard
In this digital age of lol cats, instant message immediacy, sparkly web banners and pop up ads, there is not a better target for a postcard than that of the cultured wine drinker. The luxury of wine denotes a subscription to a slower, higher quality lifestyle. A good postcard does the same.

Powerful headline
A good postcard makes use of the headline. Grab the viewer’s attention and get them curious with a statement like “5 Courses – 65 Wines.” Have fun with it, but know your audience too. “The Redefine Wine and Dine Event” speaks to a very different audience than “Drink Up Bitches” as a headline.

It Should Look and Feel as Good as the Wine
You have a special opportunity with any print media to deliver actual quality rather than trying to convey it. Like an unfiltered Chardonnay, the substrate can be rich and full-bodied with a real tactile experience. Or, capture an oily texture with a coated stock that will really showcase the colors with refinement and polish. The feel of the winery can really be promoted here as the entire, full bleed side of the postcard is available to be designed.

Information
Of course, don’t forget to give them the information. Provide the date of the event, the time, location and description of why they really shouldn’t be missing out. Give them a link to find more information online but make sure the URL is short and sweet. They can’t click on it so it’s never been more important to avoid that convoluted jumble of nonsensical letters, numbers and special characters. (Really, though, it’s always a good idea.)

Be sure to include:

•date
•time
•description
•where they can find more information
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