Posts Tagged ‘When’

The origin of French wine.

The origin of French wine.

A new study finds evidence that ancient Gauls began wine production in 425 B.C. in the Languedoc

Dom Pérignon, Pétrus, Domaine de la Romanée-Conti—the roots of these iconic wines and all of French wine culture may lie in a simple stone press, according to new scientific research. Uncovered in the Mediterranean town of Lattes, just south of Montpelier, the roughly 2,400-year-old artifact was originally identified by archaeologists as an olive-oil press. But a new round of chemical and archaeological analysis now identifies the press as the earliest evidence of wine production in France.

The analysis, headed by Patrick McGovern, the scientific director of the Biomolecular Archaeology Laboratory at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, and reported in the current issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, uses an array of evidence to not only hypothesize when the French started making wine, but who originally taught them how to do it.

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At the roots of organic wine ...

At the roots of organic wine …

 

“Do you offer organic wine?” It’s a question I hear frequently while on the wine trail.

Wine retailers, once cautious about the idea are suddenly eager to stock organic wine. A smattering of selections has burgeoned in recent years, crowding store displays. Once on the fringe, brands featuring words like nature, earth and the prefix “eco” now edge closer to the wine mainstream as consumer interest intensifies. But the simple question remains: which wines labeled as organic are really worth a look?

Not many, it turns out. Wine brands marketed as organic are seldom worth bringing home again. It’s unusual to find a drinkable red — with Organic splashed across the front label — which begs another taste.

For supporters of organic consumption, there’s a bright side; one you’ll find useful if you support some notion of organic farming and expect well-made wine to boot.

The far more exciting end of organic viticulture is the juice made from organically farmed grapes — from France, Italy and Spain, as well as from domestic producers — where organic may be barely noticeable on labels. It’s wine sold on the merits of taste and authenticity first. Validating these wines requires reading fine print, or decoding unfamiliar symbols. Quite a few estates feature organic production without fanfare or gaudy marketing campaigns. The challenge is finding them.

In the 1980s, the fledging category began to appear in stores, with wines from California among the first examples available in mass distribution. Initially the concept raised a murmur of excitement, in part because organics were considered healthier options than conventional versions. People bought organic wine as they did food, mostly to avoid a perceived surplus of chemical herbicides, pesticides, fertilizers and other additives thought to be common in conventionally made wine. From the outset, however, customers encountered unstable, highly variable bottles. Many of the wines were hard to identify from the varietals listed on the labels. Opening the early organic bottles was like spinning a roulette wheel — one bottle stinky and cloudy, another one browning, dull, others grapey but odd examples. Moreover, the wines were expensive for the times. Organic wine seemed more an experiment than a reliable new category. Consumers had every right to worry about chemical additives in winemaking, but it remained that bottles had to taste as good, or better than conventional versions.

 

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Americans tend to eat more calories and fat on the days they also have alcoholic drinks, a new study suggests.

“Food choices changed on the days that people drank… and changed in an unhealthier direction for both men and women,” said Rosalind Breslow, a nutritional epidemiologist at the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism and the lead author of the study.

She said the new information gives people an opportunity to be more aware of what they’re eating on the days they imbibe.

In a previous study, Breslow found people who drink more tend to have poorer diets in general, compared to those who drink less. For the current research, she and her colleagues looked at volunteers’ diets on both the days they drank and the days they abstained.

The data came from a large U.S. health and lifestyle survey conducted in 2003 through 2008.

More than 1,800 people answered a diet questionnaire on two days within a 10-day span – one day when they drank and another when they did not. When people did imbibe, they had an average of two to three alcoholic beverages at a time, most commonly beer and wine.

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You have to tweet , when you have to tweet!

 

 

When do people use social media like Facebook or Twitterr? Nearly half (48.6 percent) do it while in the “reading room,” according to a recent online survey by CreditDonkey.com, a credit card comparison website.

 

And almost as many — 47.6 percent — admitted to doing it while drunk.
According to the survey, those who use social media when nature calls are more likely to be checking Facebook than tweeting.
They are also less likely to do their online shopping while gazing at the screen in the toilet, the survey found.
Males are more likely to engage in both toilet tweeting and drunk posting, says CreditDonkey, perhaps because of the ubiquitous smartphone.
Other survey highlights include:
• 51.4 percent of male respondents have used social media while under the influence of alcohol versus 41.4 percent of female respondents.
• 54.0 percent of male respondents have used social media while on the toilet versus 40.4 percent of female respondents.
• 43.5 percent of all respondents use their smartphone mostly for social networking.

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Are you a wine geek?

Are you a wine geek?

8 Signs That You Might Be a Wine Geek

Want to know if you’ve reached wine geekdom?
 
Being wine smart is awesome, but it has its drawbacks. Some of these drawbacks include strange incessant wine habits. If you’ve caught yourself doing any of the following, you might be a wine geek.

You Might be a Wine Geek if…

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When to open that fine bottle of wine in the cellar?

When to open that fine bottle of wine in the cellar?

Our editors share the top celebrations for popping your oldest and finest bottlings.

Cellaring wine can become a tricky enterprise. It’s tough enough to resist popping the cork of a fine bottle as soon as you buy it. (Indeed, 80% of wines are consumed within 48 hours of being purchased.) But even if you’re patient enough to properly store your wine, choosing just the right moment to open it can prove challenging. Here, Wine Enthusiast editors share five special celebrations they say warrant a trip to the cellar.

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