Posts Tagged ‘with’

The origin of French wine.

The origin of French wine.

A new study finds evidence that ancient Gauls began wine production in 425 B.C. in the Languedoc

Dom Pérignon, Pétrus, Domaine de la Romanée-Conti—the roots of these iconic wines and all of French wine culture may lie in a simple stone press, according to new scientific research. Uncovered in the Mediterranean town of Lattes, just south of Montpelier, the roughly 2,400-year-old artifact was originally identified by archaeologists as an olive-oil press. But a new round of chemical and archaeological analysis now identifies the press as the earliest evidence of wine production in France.

The analysis, headed by Patrick McGovern, the scientific director of the Biomolecular Archaeology Laboratory at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, and reported in the current issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, uses an array of evidence to not only hypothesize when the French started making wine, but who originally taught them how to do it.

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French wine industry rooted in Italy!

French wine industry has Italian roots!

The earliest evidence of wine in France suggests that it came from Italy, and that it was mixed with basil, thyme and other herbs, according to new research.

This early wine may have been used as medicine, and likely was imbibed by the wealthy and powerful before eventually becoming a popular beverage enjoyed by the masses, researchers said.

The artefacts found at the French port site of Lattara, near the southern city of Montpellier, suggest that winemaking took root in France as early as 500 BC, as a result of libations and traditions introduced by the ancient Etruscans in what is now Italy.

The analysis in the US journal the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences is based on ancient wine containers and a limestone press brought by seafaring Etruscan travellers.

“France’s rise to world prominence in the wine culture has been well documented,” said lead author Patrick McGovern, director of the bimolecular archaeology laboratory at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology.

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Don't forget the consumers with a sweet tooth!

Don’t forget the consumers with a sweet tooth!

 

The wine industry is failing to keep up with changing tastes among consumers, according to drinks analyst Jonny Forsyth of Mintel, speaking at the LIWF today.

 

Forsyth said consumers are becoming increasingly sweet toothed and adventurous in the products they choose.

 

However, he added, unlike other industries the wine trade is failing to keep up, to its commercial detriment.

 

Forsyth said: “Consumers are evolving, I’m not convinced that wine is evolving quite enough to follow this.”

 

He added sugar consumption in the UK had risen by 31% since 1990, with the average Brit now consuming 700g of sugar each week while in the US each American consumes 130lb of sugar per year.

 

Forsyth said the impact can already be seen in the industry, with rosé now having a market share in the UK of 11%, up from just 1% 10 years ago.

 

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Sex, drugs, and wine ...

Sex, drugs, and wine …

Intemperance comes in many flavors, and SLO Down Wines has pairings for all of them.

The California winemaker has rolled out three irreverent ads (from Harvest Films director Baker Smith and Arcade Edit’s Paul Martinez and Dean Miyahira) about how well its Sexual Chocolate wine goes with group sex, horse role playing and bong rips, respectively. There’s some light parody of insufferable wine-chat (“It’s the deep red of a … really red thing”), but they don’t spend too much time dwelling on it, and I’m glad they committed to the weird direction these ads went in. Well, except for the part where I saw Brandon Allen in a thong. I may need a glass of wine to throw in my eyes after that.
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A student at Arizona State University, who passed out after a drinking competition, was left in a wheelchair in a hospital lobby with a Post-it note telling doctors that he had been drinking.
Police are now considering whether to charge the 19-year-old student, who has not been named, with underage drinking.

Police spokesman Sgt Michael Pooley said that the student was found in the emergency room lobby of St Luke’s Hospital in Tempe, Arizona. The note had been stuck to the student saying that he had been drinking and he needed help.

 

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Learn how to promote your wine events better.

Learn how to promote your wine events better.

 

While using social media or any kind of mail, e or snail, it can be difficult to stay on the correct side of the line between “how very interesting” and “report spam.” When done right, postcards, email and Facebook can be great ways to get the word out and keep your audience clued in about your winery’s upcoming events.

In the case of all 3, make sure that the names in your database were volunteered and not harvested from another online source by you or a broker. Trust in mailing lists has been declining for a while now thanks to their abuse. However, if your recipients asked to receive updates then your response rates will directly reflect that vote of confidence.

Postcard
In this digital age of lol cats, instant message immediacy, sparkly web banners and pop up ads, there is not a better target for a postcard than that of the cultured wine drinker. The luxury of wine denotes a subscription to a slower, higher quality lifestyle. A good postcard does the same.

Powerful headline
A good postcard makes use of the headline. Grab the viewer’s attention and get them curious with a statement like “5 Courses – 65 Wines.” Have fun with it, but know your audience too. “The Redefine Wine and Dine Event” speaks to a very different audience than “Drink Up Bitches” as a headline.

It Should Look and Feel as Good as the Wine
You have a special opportunity with any print media to deliver actual quality rather than trying to convey it. Like an unfiltered Chardonnay, the substrate can be rich and full-bodied with a real tactile experience. Or, capture an oily texture with a coated stock that will really showcase the colors with refinement and polish. The feel of the winery can really be promoted here as the entire, full bleed side of the postcard is available to be designed.

Information
Of course, don’t forget to give them the information. Provide the date of the event, the time, location and description of why they really shouldn’t be missing out. Give them a link to find more information online but make sure the URL is short and sweet. They can’t click on it so it’s never been more important to avoid that convoluted jumble of nonsensical letters, numbers and special characters. (Really, though, it’s always a good idea.)

Be sure to include:

•date
•time
•description
•where they can find more information
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Music and wine.

Music and wine.

 

 

Stroll through the vineyards at Il Paradiso di Frassina in Montalcino and the sound of Mozart soothes your ears. If you like Beethoven, Bach or Boulez, not to mention Miles Davis, Madonna or Motörhead, you will be disappointed. Musical variety is not the point here. The Sangiovese vines are given a permanent aural diet of Mozart, pumped through 58 strategically sited speakers, and nothing else.

Sound waves have an effect on the way plants, not just vines grow, according to winemaker Federico Ricci. “Low frequencies seem to have the biggest impact, and that means certain types of classical music. We are still experimenting, but Mozart seems to work best.” Even the most ardent lover of Mozart could tire of the great composer’s oeuvre, but not vines, apparently.

If you think this sounds a bit loopy – like Prince Charles talking to his hedgerows – Ricci points out that the Mozart vineyards are stronger are more resistant to disease than those where there is no music playing. Il Paradiso di Frassina picks the former as much as two weeks before the latter. “It gives us more flexibility,” he says, “and means that we can harvest our grapes when they are perfect.”

 

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What should you drink with Big Macs or pizza? An expert analyzes the basic flavor components of America’s favorite fast foods and suggests the perfect wines for each one.

 

Fast food and wine?

Fast food and wine?

At the end of my last trip to France, my cheap, no-brand rental car broke down on my way out of Paris, directly in front of a large—and hugely busy—McDonald’s. Fate, I felt, had finally poked its finger in my back. In the nearly 20 years I’d been traveling through Europe, I had managed never to set foot in a single fast-food restaurant. This wasn’t out of some highbrow pretense, mind you—when stateside, I visit my local White Castle so often they give me my change in shares of stock. It just seemed philosophically boneheaded to eat the same food over there that I could get back home. Yet there I was, stuck in front of that familiar yellow-and-red “billions and billions” sign. It was dinnertime and I was hungry. And I wasn’t going anywhere soon.

I walked through curtains of Gauloises smoke and up to the counter, where in my best 10th-grade French I requested: “Un Big Mac, un Royal avec fromage (a Quarter Pounder with Cheese), des frites,” and—because I couldn’t resist sampling what the corporate palates had chosen to complement their cuisine—a couple of tiny bottles of vin rouge et vin blanc.

I sat there for two hours, guiltily picking at the burgers and fries, swirling and sipping the wines from little plastic cups. I was, by the way, the only one swirling and sipping anything in that place—and for good reason. Both wines were mediocre at best and actually tasted worse with the food than alone. The burgers and fries were fine.

This experience taught me two very important lessons: It doesn’t pay to drive a low-rent voiture, and the French don’t know jack about matching wine with fast food.
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Blue-Focus-Marketing-2013-Social-Media-Predictions-Cheryl-Burgess_rd

 

 

Happy New Year! Now the festivities are over and the crystal glasses are back in the cupboard, it’s time to take out the crystal ball. Here are 10 of the most significant wine trends to watch for in 2013:

 

1. Bull market for consumption:

It may not be a bull market for much in the United States these days, but it’s a bull market for wine consumption. The year just finished may well mark the 19th consecutive 12-month period of growth in per capita consumption, resulting in the U.S. becoming the largest wine market in the world (though it remains a mere middleweight in per capita terms). Wine is hot; wine is the new black.

While Baby Boomers may reach for familiar selections, the youngest wine consumers – the Millennials – show a strong interest in wines and a curiosity to try them from many different regions or grapes.

2. The winter of wine critics:

These same Millennials are different from their elders in how they get wine recommendations – they rely on friends (both online and offline) and store clerks more than they value the opinions of the critics who have guided consumers over the past three decades. America today boasts one of the most knowledgeable wine-buying populations in the world, leading to the profusion of blogs and tweets and status updates about wine. While point-spewing critics may have helped create this knowledge base, increasingly savvy consumers are looking elsewhere for recommendations.

3. The threat of craft beer:

The rise of craft beer in America is a tremendously exciting story. While the makers of macro brews keep buying one another and consolidating in a time of flat suds, the micro brewers are experiencing 16-percent growth. Younger buyers are attracted to the beers that actually have flavor profiles, rather than ones that simply slake a summer thirst or wash down wings.

With cicerones (beer sommeliers) popping up at restaurants, and with beer’s perceived relative value-for-money status, it’s no surprise that the San Francisco-based news website SF Weekly recently wrote: “Craft beer is overtaking wine as San Francisco’s beverage of choice.” Craft beer and a less-than-robust economy pose the biggest threat to the bull market in American wine consumption.

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