Posts Tagged ‘Year’

German beer consumption hit a 20 year low. But why?

German beer consumption hit a 20 year low. But why?

Following the news that beer consumption in the UK was down by 50 million pints in the first quarter of this year, comes the news that sales in Germany have slumped as well.

According to figures released by Germany’s Federal Statistical Office, in March domestic sales of beer fell by 10.9% year-on-year; exports were also down, falling by 13.3% over the same period.

Over the first quarter of this year German beer sales dropped to 19.9 million hectolitres, the lowest amount for at least 20 years. Volume dropped 4.3% to the lowest level since 1993, when the data were adjusted to exclude alcohol-free beer.

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Back to an iconic era ...

Back to an iconic era …

 

In an era of doom and gloom, the drinks industry is looking to yesteryear to provide comfort and inspiration, writes Spiros Malandrakis of Euromonitor

NOSTALGIA RESEMBLES a floating, safe-haven currency. The darker the front covers in today’s press, the stronger the allure of concepts, designs and branding alluding to the rose-tinted memories of yesteryear. The alcoholic drinks industry’s inherently cyclical nature, its tradition-steeped narrative and unique aptitude in reflecting shifting societal undercurrents could not but bring such references to the fore.

The signs have undoubtedly been there for a while, true offspring of the Great Recession, if not necessarily relevant to specific brands per se. The “Mad Men effect” proved to fittingly capture the zeitgeist while catapulting sales of bourbon and old-fashioned cocktails across the West. Localisation and the “micro” movements can also be viewed as a nod to much sought-after values of innocence, craftsmanship and heritage – a fact vividly highlighted in many brands’ decidedly old-school logos.
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1500 year old wine press.

1500 year old wine press.

 

Archaeologists have unearthed a huge wine press and rare ceramic church model near the city’s old highway.

Archaeologists from the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA) have unearthed a huge wine press and a ceramic model of a church dating back to the 5th and 6th centuries, the early-Byzantine period.

The huge wine press, the size of a football field, consists of three components, IAA archaeologist Dr. Rina Avner explained.

“A large treading floor paved with ceramic tiles was discovered in the center in which there is a press bed of a screw used to press grapes. Three vats into which the must flowed were revealed along the western side of the treading floor. The collecting vats were carefully designed with slots in their sides that allowed the liquid to flow in a controlled manner and they were treated with hydraulic plaster so as to prevent the must from seeping into the ground.”

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Study reveals less wine being drunk by the French.

Study reveals less wine being drunk by the French.

A surprising 38 per cent of the French don’t drink wine at all, up from 19.2 per cent in 1980.

The French are drinking less wine, very much less.
It is always a shock to the system when nations fail to live up to their stereotypes. Next thing you know, the French will be opposing long lunches, gay marriage, precision in all things and the inalienable right of all Paris waiters to be bloody rude to well-meaning tourists who blunder in saying “Bonjour” rather than “Bonjour monsieur.”
Yes, I can report that the French are putting the brakes on everything except precision because it’s too much fun tormenting those who don’t know precisely how things are done in France. How are they done? Just so. The damask tablecloth is ironed from beneath, the cheeses must not fight each other, do not smile at passersby like an idiot lest you be taken for an American.
There were demonstrations recently against French President François Hollande’s plan to legalize gay marriage. This one I could possibly explain away with the classic definition of marriage as “a friendship recognized by the police.” Perhaps the French were simply supporting the alleged sexual licentiousness of the gay population which will be tamed by marriage, although not by French marriage from what I hear.

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Ouch!

 

Unlike most other wine categories, Champagne sales were not sufficiently buoyed by surging demand from Asia and North America to compensate for declining shipments to Europe in 2012. A large share of consignments are Europe-bound and because of this, the economic crisis hit the region with a full frontal attack.

 

According to Champagne marketing board CIVC, sales of Champagne for the first eleven months of 2012 were down 3.8 percent on the previous year. The fall is primarily due to a drop in sales in France – the region’s largest market – where they declined by 5.2 percent to 144.35 million bottles, though also to falling volumes in Europe. Moving annual totals within Europe dropped by 8.3 percent due to markets such as the United Kingdom and Germany. However, Thibaut Le Mailloux, spokesman for the marketing board, said the figures should be put into perspective: “the downturn comes on the back of two years of strong growth that followed the 2008-2009 financial crisis”.

Fortunately, although many of the region’s sales outlets are in Europe, non-EU countries came to the rescue with a rise of 3.5 percent in sales. The Chinese market may well be geared to red wines, the first half of 2012 saw it reach a turning point with China entering the top 10 export destinations for Champagne for the first time ever. Sales surged by almost 100 percent to 947,713 bottles over the half-year. Fellow Asian market Japan also rose significantly (+26 percent) to over 4.5 million bottles.

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The average per annum wine consumption for a Canadian adult is now 15 litres.

 

Wine producers will be proposing a toast to Canadian consumers: a new study shows wine consumption in this country is growing three times faster than globally and Canada is projected to be the fifth fastest-growing wine market in the next five years.

Most of the wine consumed in Canada is imported but “Canada is now very strong on the production side and domestic wines are getting more popular,” said Vinexpo chairman Xavier de Eizaguirre in a telephone interview, speaking from Toronto.

“But the fact there is now a local industry, particularly here in Ontario, is helping the overall picture. Volume-wise it’s certainly a country where consumption is going up. Our forecast is it will continue to go up in the next five years.”

Growing market
De Eizaguirre said Canada’s per capita wine consumption is around 15 litres a year, compared to about 12 in the U.S.

“France, Italy, Spain, the traditional markets, consume somewhere around 50 litres per capita. England is about 25, Argentina is about 45, so there is a lot of potential” for Canada to increase its consumption, he said.

Between 2007 and 2011, Canadian wine consumption increased by 14.55 per cent. Consumption hit 43.21 million cases in 2011; one case represents 12 bottles.

Analysts said that between 2012 and 2016 Canadian wine consumption will go up 14.27 per cent, eventually reaching 50.7 million cases annually, which is three times greater than the global average.

Between 2012 and 2016, China, the United States, Russia and Germany will be ahead of Canada in wine consumption. In the previous five years, Canada was third behind China and the U.S.

“You’ve dropped back because the others have gone quite crazy,” de Eizaguirre said.
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2012 is a good year!

2012 is a good year!

 

Champagne producers including Dom Perignon and Philipponnat have confirmed they will make a vintage in 2012.

Despite what vignerons at the time called one of the worst growing seasons they had seen for decades, with April frosts, hailstorms, and one of the wettest summers on record, they are highly optimistic for the quality of the vintage.

‘The quality and the intensity are definitely there to make an outstanding vintage,’ Dom Perignon chef de cave Richard Geoffroy told Decanter.com.

Winegrowers said the warm weather in August was a saving grace. As harvest grew closer it became apparent that the small amounts of grapes on the vines were of excellent quality. In September as grapes were picked and pressed, often at close to 11% alcohol, winemakers were amazed by the concentration of flavour, natural sugar and acidity, and talk of a potential vintage began to be widespread.

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Hong Kong wine scene.

Hong Kong wine scene.

 

After climbing steadily over the previous three years, 2012 was not a great one for the wine auction market.

 

Sales of fine and rare wine slumped 19 percent last year, according to Wine Spectator, with worldwide revenues falling from $478 million in 2011 to $389 million last year. However, the details reveal a more nuanced picture, with the numbers coming out of Hong Kong far more grim than those from the United States.
According to the report, auction revenues were down 10 percent in the U.S. and a full 32 percent in Hong Kong. Richard Harvey, the senior international director of wine at Bonhams, attributed the drop in revenues to decreasing prices for Bordeaux wines, particularly Chateau Lafite Rothschild, which was wildly popular in China for a short period before demand cooled in late 2011.

There is, of course, an argument to be made that the wine market is… read on

 

It’s a new year and, for wine lovers, an auspicious one at that.

After austerity measures in recent years, there’s a desire to make this a year when we drink well again.

Here, then, are my five themes to watch in 2013:

1. Rewriting expectations:

The wine industry has long traded on certain beliefs about quality and style. But rules are quietly being rewritten all over. The conversation has changed.

In California, the drumbeat of the new has been approaching for at least three years. This year it hits the mainstream.

Faithful readers have seen it in these pages for a while, but even by last summer it was becoming clear that a different story line for California wine (our Winemakers of the Year being a good example: bit.ly/VgPsLO) was gaining credence not just in San Francisco or New York, but across the country.

Similar shifts are taking place around the world. France has a burgeoning avant-garde, in Beaujolais and the Loire and little-known regional appellations – vintners who are stepping in as Bordeaux and Burgundy give in to the whims of the rich and aspirational.

Germany is reveling in young producers, people like A.J. Adam and Florian Lauer, as conversant with dry styles as they are with sweet.

The maturing of Austria’s industry (bit.ly/VHwBqF) is yielding wines of unmistakable purity. Even Australia is revising its story line, highlighting finesse where obvious flavor once squatted. Never before has it been so possible to love wine without having to educate yourself about old expectations.
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crystal-ball

 

Some things you may not know about me:

My favorite color is SAE/ECE amber—one of the few technically approved colors for automotive signal lamps.  Also, I enjoy long, romantic strolls on the beach at sunset.  As well, there is nothing that makes me happier than being awoken by a snuggly, huggly puppy nuzzling my crotch.  Equally, I can predict the future.

I discovered this last talent as a teenager, having found a magical ‘book’ in our den that foretold precisely where I would be and what I would be doing at, say, 12:00 PM the following Sunday—and it proved to be absolutely accurate.  Of course, it was TV Guide and AMC was showing the entire remastered Godfather trilogy at noon, so this is probably not a really good example.

I have noticed, however, that several times each year—especially when I am under undue stress from collection agencies and Friend of the Court—when I sit down to write a wine column, it is almost as if I sink into a fugue state and some occult Ouija force takes control of my fingers and types for me.

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