Posts Tagged ‘Your’

 

The key to winery social media success is to stay consistent and keep up-to-date with your fans by posting comments about your winery.

 

It’s easy to open a page and be committed to it for a while, but then feeling it’s too time consuming, or getting stumped with writers block, you begin to slowly drift away and hope that the page is running itself. We previously posted a blog about a program we offer, where you can effectively spend 20 minutes a week on Facebook promoting your winery to your customers and now we have a plan to help you utilize those 20 minutes by engaging those clients with 5 Great Topics to Post to Your Facebook Page.

Post about Your Winery Production

Club and potential club members will go to your Facebook page as outsiders looking in. They’re fans of your winery and they want to know what’s happening on the inside, they’ll be curious about what you’re up to. Give them visual access to the inside of your winery by posting pictures about:

•Changes or improvements of your vineyard
•Harvest Season
•Winemaking process
•Bottling
Promote an Event
I can’t remember the last time I got an actual paper invitation in the mail. All of my invitations come electronically anymore. If you want to build wine club memberships, generate a guest list or interest to an upcoming event, or discuss a post event, upload it to Facebook. Share photos and posts of:

•A venue you’re going to that may be outside of your winery
•Internal events that are coming up
•Post internal events
•Release of a new vintage
•A special wine tasting
•A successful cooking class
Read on …

Drinking wine may well prevent kidney stone problems.

Drinking wine may well prevent kidney stone problems.

 

Coffee, tea, beer, and wine seem to make kidney stones less likely.
PROBLEM:

Kidney stones cause the sort of pain that people rate as highly as childbirth. They also cost the U.S. about $2 billion per year, caring for them and in terms of the missed work they cause. Ounces of prevention being worth ounces of stone-free urine, what are the best things to drink to keep kidney stones from forming?

METHODOLOGY:

Researchers led by Dr. Pietro Manuel Ferraro at Catholic University of the Sacred Heart in Rome and Dr. Gary Curhan at Harvard reviewed data from 194,095 patients who had never before had kidney stones, for an average of eight years. The subjects all reported what they drank (on an annual or biennial basis), and how many stones they got.

The research did not involve ultrasounds or CT scans on all of those people to look for stones — CT scans on 194,095 people would cause at least a few to get cancer — so they only counted people who experienced symptoms from stones, like pain or blood in their urine. That means there were others who had secret stones that no one ever knew about.
Read on …

Learn how to promote your wine events better.

Learn how to promote your wine events better.

 

While using social media or any kind of mail, e or snail, it can be difficult to stay on the correct side of the line between “how very interesting” and “report spam.” When done right, postcards, email and Facebook can be great ways to get the word out and keep your audience clued in about your winery’s upcoming events.

In the case of all 3, make sure that the names in your database were volunteered and not harvested from another online source by you or a broker. Trust in mailing lists has been declining for a while now thanks to their abuse. However, if your recipients asked to receive updates then your response rates will directly reflect that vote of confidence.

Postcard
In this digital age of lol cats, instant message immediacy, sparkly web banners and pop up ads, there is not a better target for a postcard than that of the cultured wine drinker. The luxury of wine denotes a subscription to a slower, higher quality lifestyle. A good postcard does the same.

Powerful headline
A good postcard makes use of the headline. Grab the viewer’s attention and get them curious with a statement like “5 Courses – 65 Wines.” Have fun with it, but know your audience too. “The Redefine Wine and Dine Event” speaks to a very different audience than “Drink Up Bitches” as a headline.

It Should Look and Feel as Good as the Wine
You have a special opportunity with any print media to deliver actual quality rather than trying to convey it. Like an unfiltered Chardonnay, the substrate can be rich and full-bodied with a real tactile experience. Or, capture an oily texture with a coated stock that will really showcase the colors with refinement and polish. The feel of the winery can really be promoted here as the entire, full bleed side of the postcard is available to be designed.

Information
Of course, don’t forget to give them the information. Provide the date of the event, the time, location and description of why they really shouldn’t be missing out. Give them a link to find more information online but make sure the URL is short and sweet. They can’t click on it so it’s never been more important to avoid that convoluted jumble of nonsensical letters, numbers and special characters. (Really, though, it’s always a good idea.)

Be sure to include:

•date
•time
•description
•where they can find more information
Read on …

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It’s time to boldly go into the universe of dinner parties. Hosting a dinner party is a great way to build longlasting relationships and create a better community of friends. Turns out, your friends are an ingenious source for good wine. On average, people are willing to spend more on wine for a party.

Yep. Time to host a party!

How do you make your dinner party awesome? Here are 12 dinner party ideas that aren’t only kickass but also simple to pull off. Read on!
Elegant Dinner Party
The ultimate dinner party is best when it’s no larger than 6-8 people. Keep in mind you’ll be serving a minimum of 3 courses at a properly set table. Serve the first course while your guests are being seated and have the 2nd course ready to transfer into large warm serving dishes.

Everyone has allergies these days, so ask before they awkwardly spill the beans about being Gluten-free or Vegetarian.

Elegant Dinner Party Ideas

Wine Picks
6 bottles: 2 white & 4 red (8 people). Stick to classics like Sauvignon Blanc, Chardonnay and Cabernet Sauvignon. Pre-plan who is bringing what.
Centerpiece
Keep the centerpiece short so you can see your pals across the table. Use real fruit, real candles or small flowers. After all, you’re real, right?
Etiquette
Serve Champagne prior to seating your friends because it works fastest. Place double sided namecards at the table so your friends don’t have to think.
Wine Place Setting
(From left right) Dessert, Red, White, Champagne and Water glass. Hydration is key.
Who sits where?
Split up couples and don’t seat yourself at the head of the table.

Read on …

What is in a bottle?

 

The Journey
Bernie Rooney, owner of Oak Barrel Winecraft in Berkeley, Calif., says you can make a bottle of wine for about $5 or less once you have the equipment. That’s not why people go to the trouble, though. Instead, he says, home winemakers do it to enjoy the journey — from picking the grapes to drinking the wine a year or more later. “If you collect trains, people think you’re strange,” says Paul Taybi, a home winemaker in El Cerrito, Calif. “If you make wine, you get invited to a lot of parties.” In the end, your creation may remind you of Two-Buck Chuck (the bargain producer officially known as Charles Shaw), or a 1998 Chateau Mouton Rothschild –for those who have already drunk a good quantity of wine.
Read on …

new-rules-of-wine-628

(Image courtesy of Michael Crichton)

 
You chill your whites but not your reds, pair your fancy bottles with fancy food, and skip right past the pink champagne. Guess what: You’re doing wine all wrong.

 

We talked to the best sommeliers, vintners, and career winos around to rewrite the book on this fermented-grape-juice thing. And we came up with enough great wine to keep your glass half full till 2012 and beyond

 

  • DON’T WORRY

If you didn’t pick up those subtle hints of “kaffir lime,” “black currant confiture,” and “the sweet stemminess of burning vine clippings”* when you stuck your nose into the glass. Take a look at two different tasting notes for the same bottle of wine—same vineyard, same vintage, two different critics. They almost never taste or smell the same stuff. Which is to say—your guess is as good as theirs. So drink. Decide what you like. And if you detect a hint of quince paste in your Sauvignon Blanc, keep it to yourself.—Stan Parish

* Real Wine Spectator tasting notes!

 

  • YES, WE’VE HEARD ALL ABOUT TERRIOR and some of us are a little sick of it

Sean Thackrey, one of the best winemakers in America (seriously, try his wine), explains why you should get your head out of the soil

The theory of terroir is the agricultural version of the theory of aristocracy: You are as you were born. You are the Duke of Norfolk or you are not the Duke of Norfolk, and that’s that. You buy Château Margaux because it’s Château Margaux, and it’s Château Margaux because the grapes were grown on a particular piece of land. So much money is riding on this idea that it’s imperative, from a financial point of view, to maintain this extremely profitable mystification of real estate. There’s no traditional word for ‘winemaker’ in French, Spanish, or Italian, because over there they’d like you to think that we humans are just humble servants of the soil’s desire to express itself. Of course grapes grown in different places taste different; that’s a banality no one disputes. But so much has to happen to those grapes before they end up in your glass, and someone—the winemaker—has to call those shots. Even if you supplied ten different restaurants with identical produce, you would expect ten totally different results. Do you really think the work of a winemaker is less complex than the work of a chef? Winemaking is like cooking: The chef bats last, for better or worse. And if we’re to take the blame for bad results that we deserve, we should get credit for good ones, too.”
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